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Intel's Newest Linux Driver Is For Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

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  • Intel's Newest Linux Driver Is For Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    Phoronix: Intel's Newest Linux Driver Is For Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    Adding to the new features coming for Linux 5.11, the Intel "RFIM" driver has been queued up as the company's latest open-source driver. The RFIM driver tweaks the DDR memory rates and fully integrated voltage regulator stemming if believed to be causing WiFi/5G interference...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...nux-Radio-RFIM

  • #2
    Wow I didn't know 5G is so feeble, sounds like an April 1st joke.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cl333r View Post
      Wow I didn't know 5G is so feeble, sounds like an April 1st joke.
      Everything HF is so feeble. Signals reaching the Antenna can be as low as ~ -100dBm, that is 0.1 Picowatt, and it still works. The onboard power regulators are handling several watts, and although only a small part is radiated keep in mind it is a few centimeters away from your radio modules.

      E.g. USB 3.0 Gen 1 (5GBit/s) is known to heavily interfere with WLAN.

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      • #4
        uuuuh.. This may fuel interest (or perhaps it shows a spike of interest) in air-gap hacking.

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        • #5
          In other news hackers develop new side channel attack utilizing cellular WiFi to disrupt servers

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          • #6
            Or you could shield the emission source.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Teggs View Post
              Or you could shield the emission source.
              Good luck doing that when the memory controller and radio are on the same chip. I have a similar problem with a particular laptop that has an integrated Bluetooth and Wifi NIC on the same module. Wifi interferes with the Bluetooth side making it unusable when Wifi is using 2.4 GHz.

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              • #8
                This sounds like a hardware design issue. If it was physically segmented/shielded there would be no need to gimp the power to everything else. EMI blocking is college level basic computing design. Unless there is some harmonic waveform colliding issue, but that doesn't sound like what this is.

                I think I'll be staying away from those architectures in the future.

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                • #9
                  I'll play along with this. Intel hardware? Severe dysfunction? Naaah?
                  Now visualize my totally surprised face expression right now...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StefanBruens View Post

                    Everything HF is so feeble. Signals reaching the Antenna can be as low as ~ -100dBm, that is 0.1 Picowatt, and it still works. The onboard power regulators are handling several watts, and although only a small part is radiated keep in mind it is a few centimeters away from your radio modules.

                    E.g. USB 3.0 Gen 1 (5GBit/s) is known to heavily interfere with WLAN.
                    "Welcome to the world of analog EE, software people"

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