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  • #11
    Originally posted by duby229 View Post

    "architecture dedicated compilation" Is only a small part of what ClearLinux does.... Almost all else of what they actually do is hardcoded hacks and cracks and patches are never made available. I mean there are patches available of course, yes, but those available patches only represent a small proportion of all the actual modifications made to ClearLinux. Duplicating absolutely every modification ClearLinux makes would probably be nearly impossible.
    You are right using term "compilation" was to narrow indeed they have a lot of patches aswell. I can recommend to have a look into the spec files of their autospec tool - clearlinux/pkg at their github repo.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post

      Do you remember the chipset compitition via*, intel, amd and nvidia? ...the only time were benchmarks of motherboards had significant differences.
      (I know northbridge is now more or less on the CPU but it was fun to compare boards by performance. Nowadays its just about features...or RGB or no RGB)

      *MSI K7T266 Pro 2 I loved that mb with the Athlon XP 1700+ ....rock stable and super fast VIA Chipset
      Yes I do...but you forgot serverworks and AMD (remember the 760 series Irongate). These were not lightning fast but they were rock-solid. I remember when SuperMicro started building AMD boards - and Tyan. Hell, Tyan even built server/worksation boards for AMD with nVidia chipsets. But if I recall, nVidia did not build chipsets for Intel. For performance, Via and nVidia had great chipsets for AMD. But you are right about the motherboard benchmarks. As I mentioned in a previous post in another forum, today is easier. Then you had to worry about the front side bus and all of that matching - particularly on builds. And the overclocking made it even more fun.

      Competition should be interesting.
      GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

        Yes I do...but you forgot serverworks and AMD (remember the 760 series Irongate).
        I certainly remember the VIA 686B disaster, I've had a crappy Elitegroup board back then and the sound was crackling due to that hardware bug. That brings back memories.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by ms178 View Post

          I certainly remember the VIA 686B disaster, I've had a crappy Elitegroup board back then and the sound was crackling due to that hardware bug. That brings back memories.
          That it does. I also had an Elitegroup board once with a Via 686B - and it was s**t. It was in one of my kid's computers (my son's). The specs looked good - the implementation was horrible. I replaced it with an Asus - much better.
          GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

            That it does. I also had an Elitegroup board once with a Via 686B - and it was s**t. It was in one of my kid's computers (my son's). The specs looked good - the implementation was horrible. I replaced it with an Asus - much better.
            Hehe, it seems we thought along the same lines, I went with an ASUS A7V333 later on and it served me quite well.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

              Yes I do...but you forgot serverworks and AMD (remember the 760 series Irongate). These were not lightning fast but they were rock-solid. I remember when SuperMicro started building AMD boards - and Tyan. Hell, Tyan even built server/worksation boards for AMD with nVidia chipsets. But if I recall, nVidia did not build chipsets for Intel. For performance, Via and nVidia had great chipsets for AMD. But you are right about the motherboard benchmarks. As I mentioned in a previous post in another forum, today is easier. Then you had to worry about the front side bus and all of that matching - particularly on builds. And the overclocking made it even more fun.

              Competition should be interesting.
              Nvidia did build chipsets my friend had one in his Q6600 rig... after that Intel kicked them to the curb though. I don't remember all the details but it was something to the effect of Nvidia being Nvidia and not getting along.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by ms178 View Post

                Hehe, it seems we thought along the same lines, I went with an ASUS A7V333 later on and it served me quite well.
                That is TOO f**king funny...that is the same motherboard that I bought! Did not the V333 mean it was a 333 MHz front side bus? Did not the V mean Via chip set? I seem to remember that the K7N boards had nVidia chipsets?
                f0rmat
                Senior Member
                Last edited by f0rmat; 11 November 2020, 03:32 PM.
                GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by cb88 View Post

                  Nvidia did build chipsets my friend had one in his Q6600 rig... after that Intel kicked them to the curb though. I don't remember all the details but it was something to the effect of Nvidia being Nvidia and not getting along.
                  Thanks for the correction.
                  GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

                    That is TOO f**king funny...that is the same motherboard that I bought! Did not the V333 mean it was a 333 MHz front side bus? Did not the V mean Via chip set? I seem to remember that the K7N boards had nVidia chipsets?
                    Yes, it was also a VIA chipset, for some reason I still trusted them after the fiasco before. The N-series was indeed their Nvidia-chipset line and there were some boards there for the same AMD CPU's (a friend in college went with such an ASUS board with an Nvidia chipset instead), but I don't exactly remember the reason why I didn't went with those, maybe availability, price or some heat issues with the Nvidia-chipset, I cannot remember exactly.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post

                      Do you remember the chipset compitition via*, intel, amd and nvidia? ...the only time were benchmarks of motherboards had significant differences.
                      (I know northbridge is now more or less on the CPU but it was fun to compare boards by performance. Nowadays its just about features...or RGB or no RGB)

                      *MSI K7T266 Pro 2 I loved that mb with the Athlon XP 1700+ ....rock stable and super fast VIA Chipset
                      There were more than that. SiS, ServerWorks, VIA, ALi/ULi, Intel, AMD, ATi and nVidia all made chipsets at one point. If you had an Athlon 64/Opteron, it could have been equipped with a chipset from any one of those manufacturers except Intel!

                      Eventually ALi/ULi got absorbed by nVidia. ATi got absorbed by AMD. nVidia got out of the chipset game once AMD bought ATi. SiS and VIA also left the chipset game once AMD was rolling their own competent chipsets every CPU generation.

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