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Intel's IGC Linux Network Driver For 2.5G Ethernet Speeds Up By ~7%

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  • Intel's IGC Linux Network Driver For 2.5G Ethernet Speeds Up By ~7%

    Phoronix: Intel's IGC Linux Network Driver For 2.5G Ethernet Speeds Up By ~7%

    Wiring up an additional feature for Intel's IGC Linux network driver that is for their 2.5G Ethernet devices is allowing data to be sent up to 7% or so faster...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...=Intel-IGC-TSO

  • #2
    10 Gbit Ethernet was standardized in 2002. By 2007, the industry shipped over one million 10GBe ports. Now it's 2020, and I've been wondering for several years where my home network 10GigE options were. These cats think we want a standard slower than 2002's 10GigE in 2020? What are they smoking over there? Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T and give it to me a decade ago.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chroma View Post
      10 Gbit Ethernet was standardized in 2002. By 2007, the industry shipped over one million 10GBe ports. Now it's 2020, and I've been wondering for several years where my home network 10GigE options were. These cats think we want a standard slower than 2002's 10GigE in 2020? What are they smoking over there? Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T and give it to me a decade ago.
      I made the switch last year for most of my devices, prices have come down quite a bit on the switches (I have one from Buffalo but I believe MicroTik also has inexpensive options). All I need now is a WiFi Router that offers 10GBase-T and supports OpenWRT. On the more expensive boards you'll now sometimes get 10GbE NICs, I personally use an akitio TB3 Docking Station for my laptop which also offers 10GbE. One problem of course is that this uses a lot more PCIe lanes which are scarce on consumer platforms (especially Intel).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by chroma View Post
        10 Gbit Ethernet was standardized in 2002. By 2007, the industry shipped over one million 10GBe ports. Now it's 2020, and I've been wondering for several years where my home network 10GigE options were. These cats think we want a standard slower than 2002's 10GigE in 2020? What are they smoking over there? Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T and give it to me a decade ago.
        From original article about driver that linked in this one:

        2.5G Ethernet has been of some interest in recent years as while 10G+ is around (albeit not very common at least in consumer environments), 2.5G (and 5G) can still operate over existing CAT5E/CAT6 Ethernet cable while 10G speeds and higher cannot work with existing cabling.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by chroma View Post
          10 Gbit Ethernet was standardized in 2002. By 2007, the industry shipped over one million 10GBe ports. Now it's 2020, and I've been wondering for several years where my home network 10GigE options were. These cats think we want a standard slower than 2002's 10GigE in 2020? What are they smoking over there? Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T and give it to me a decade ago.
          AFAIK, 10Gbit requires newer cables, whereas 2,5Gbit does not. As such, this standard is primarily aimed at regular consumers and existing networks.

          Also, feel free to buy any of the available 10Gbit add-in cards, motherboards with 10Gbit built-in and 10Gbit switches. There is plenty of quite reasonably priced options available.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by chroma View Post
            10 Gbit Ethernet was standardized in 2002. By 2007, the industry shipped over one million 10GBe ports. Now it's 2020, and I've been wondering for several years where my home network 10GigE options were. These cats think we want a standard slower than 2002's 10GigE in 2020? What are they smoking over there? Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T and give it to me a decade ago.
            Considering that most peoples' home Internet connections are still less than 100Mbit, there just hasn't been a need for it. Of course, if you want 10Gbit in your home, why not run fiber directly to all your desktops?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by chroma View Post
              Give me my goddamned 10Gbase-T
              You can get it today, if you really want it. The historical problem is that the power budget for 10Gbase-T was sufficiently high (to meet the full 100M spec) that existing SFP+ ports could not be used by spec meeting gbics for a low cost transition (yes, there were out of spec short reach solutions). And the switching fabric to support the full bisection bandwidth of multiple 10G ports also has a much (much) bigger power budget (along with being more expensive silicon). Consumers mostly want good enough, cheap, and quiet (and not full 10G capability with the 1U fans in the switch screaming at you). 2.5G (and 5G) can deliver good enough and cheap and quiet, and will likely be the next transition for many. The other challenge is that the DC often drives down the pricing due to commodification, but the hyperscalers rapidly moved from 10G to 40G to 100G (and now 400G), so the push for cheap 10G (only) silicon dissipated.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post
                You can get it today, if you really want it. The historical problem is that the power budget for 10Gbase-T was sufficiently high (to meet the full 100M spec) that existing SFP+ ports could not be used by spec meeting gbics for a low cost transition (yes, there were out of spec short reach solutions). And the switching fabric to support the full bisection bandwidth of multiple 10G ports also has a much (much) bigger power budget (along with being more expensive silicon). Consumers mostly want good enough, cheap, and quiet (and not full 10G capability with the 1U fans in the switch screaming at you). 2.5G (and 5G) can deliver good enough and cheap and quiet, and will likely be the next transition for many. The other challenge is that the DC often drives down the pricing due to commodification, but the hyperscalers rapidly moved from 10G to 40G to 100G (and now 400G), so the push for cheap 10G (only) silicon dissipated.
                AMD apparently has a 10GBe controller or two on many of thier SoCs ... it just isn't broken out unless they think people want it... obviously many people want an SFP+ port on thier desktop instead of junk 2.5GBase-T it's so much more flexible. Also you can buy DAC cables online if you don't have long runs and skip some cost.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Chugworth View Post
                  Considering that most peoples' home Internet connections are still less than 100Mbit, there just hasn't been a need for it. Of course, if you want 10Gbit in your home, why not run fiber directly to all your desktops?
                  I see this misconception a lot. I use my home network for more than just accessing the internet. I have a couple of servers and workstations that easily saturage GigE for long periods of time. It's frustrating to move a few hundred gig of data over GigE.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StandaSK View Post

                    AFAIK, 10Gbit requires newer cables, whereas 2,5Gbit does not. As such, this standard is primarily aimed at regular consumers and existing networks.

                    Also, feel free to buy any of the available 10Gbit add-in cards, motherboards with 10Gbit built-in and 10Gbit switches. There is plenty of quite reasonably priced options available.
                    What do you mean newer cables? Over a decade ago, I pulled CAT6 throughout my house expecting that 10Gig networking would come to the consumer space shortly. This 'new cable' kind of arguement comes from corporate environments where they may have a lot of CAT5 or 5E in their building and replacing it would come with a lot of cost. But for a house? You pull your own wiring--and can therefore replace old runs.

                    I don't need every run to be 10Gig, but I have a number of them that I need to be. I don't need any 100m runs, either. My longest run is maybe 30M and that's to the ONT, so it doesn't need to be >1Gig anyway.
                    Last edited by willmore; 01-07-2020, 04:57 PM.

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