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Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support Still Being Squared Away For Linux - Hopefully For 5.4

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  • Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support Still Being Squared Away For Linux - Hopefully For 5.4

    Phoronix: Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support Still Being Squared Away For Linux - Hopefully For 5.4

    Intel Icelake laptops will soon be hitting store shelves and a vast majority of the Linux support has been squared away for many months. Unfortunately one bit still not mainlined is the Thunderbolt support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Thunderbolt-V3

  • #2
    Shouldn't be a big problem even if they don't back-port to 5.3, as long as there's standard USB and you can live without Thunderbolt for a few months. Fedora, at least, regularly updates to (near) the latest stable kernel release. Fedora 30 started with 5.0.<something>, and is currently at 5.2.8.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pipe13 View Post
      Shouldn't be a big problem even if they don't back-port to 5.3, as long as there's standard USB and you can live without Thunderbolt for a few months. Fedora, at least, regularly updates to (near) the latest stable kernel release. Fedora 30 started with 5.0.<something>, and is currently at 5.2.8.
      Call me a weirdo if you want, but I consider that most distros are too slow adopting new kernel releases.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by timofonic View Post

        Call me a weirdo if you want, but I consider that most distros are too slow adopting new kernel releases.
        Indeed, I always run (close to) the most recent version. It should at least be an option.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by nils_ View Post

          Indeed, I always run (close to) the most recent version. It should at least be an option.
          Linux distributions rely on Linux kernel for hardware support. I consider backporting to be mostly a waste of time, instead using those reports debugging and improving newer versions of the kernel.

          What about improving this situation instead wasting time and efforts on useless stuff?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by timofonic View Post

            Linux distributions rely on Linux kernel for hardware support. I consider backporting to be mostly a waste of time, instead using those reports debugging and improving newer versions of the kernel.

            What about improving this situation instead wasting time and efforts on useless stuff?
            CentOS/RHEL at least have the option of using the mainline kernel via EPEL. Ubuntu maintains something they call a ppa, but it's not a real repo so you don't get updates automatically - you have to explicitly install the specific version instead of getting a package that depends on the most recent version. That can probably be rectified. At the moment I'm building my own, however that doesn't come with linux-tools when you build it as debian packages...

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