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Intel's New Iris Driver Gets Speed Boost From Changing The OpenGL Vendor String

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  • Intel's New Iris Driver Gets Speed Boost From Changing The OpenGL Vendor String

    Phoronix: Intel's New Iris Driver Gets Speed Boost From Changing The OpenGL Vendor String

    Following yesterday's Intel Iris vs. i965 OpenGL benchmarks against Windows 10, there is already an optimization out of our latest testing as a result...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...L-Speed-Vendor

  • #2
    What does Portal do on Intel that doesn't in other platforms?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      What does Portal do on Intel that doesn't in other platforms?
      Intel is a shared memory platform and utilized tiled rendering to some extent. This makes it possess different performance characteristics than other cards - basically, some things are faster than with Nvidia/AMD, but some are slower. Given that it's graphics rendering we're talking about and there's often more than a single way to get to the same result, it's perfectly reasonable for a complicated, well-optimized game engine to take different code paths on different hardware architectures.

      For (a very simplistic) example, on a platform with not a lot memory bandwidth, small caches, but huge fillrate, you'd draw multiple layers of fullscreen textures with multiple drawcalls, as rasterizing with blending is the faster path there; while on a platform with big caches and tiny fillrate, you'd rather attach multiple textures to one shader and get it blended all at once - an approach that won't work so well on the first platform due to cache misses.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
        What does Portal do on Intel that doesn't in other platforms?
        If I recall correctly, Valve mentioned that they have to write their own implementations of a OpenGL extension that provides functions which restore state after they're done. Every vendor but Intel has these. This is just one of many examples, I've heard of other developers having problems with things like multi-colored lighting effects. Software like browsers has blacklists for GPUs that cause trouble (and considering how nasty certain Intel GPUs can be, especially sandy bridge, it makes a lot of sense).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dos1 View Post
          ...post...
          I see. Thanks for the explanation, but,

          Originally posted by dos1 View Post
          Intel is a shared memory platform and utilized tiled rendering to some extent.
          What about Xe?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

            I see. Thanks for the explanation, but,



            What about Xe?
            Aside of discrete VRAM, it will most likely have similar performance characteristics to current integrated GPUs from Intel - just with a lot more horsepower attached. This is (IMO) what actually makes Xe very interesting.

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            • #7
              Are there any games that also do vendor check, but actually know about Mesa and look for that specific vendor string? This could also change code paths, with whatever effect.

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              • #8
                in first mesa release of 2020 this new driver will work much better than the old one and maybe at same level of windows one, nice work intel

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by andre30correia View Post
                  in first mesa release of 2020 this new driver will work much better than the old one and maybe at same level of windows one, nice work intel
                  I was under the impression that Intel driver on Windows is a pile of crap. Did this change?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dos1 View Post
                    Aside of discrete VRAM, it will most likely have similar performance characteristics to current integrated GPUs from Intel - just with a lot more horsepower attached. This is (IMO) what actually makes Xe very interesting.
                    Is this based on anything more than pure speculation and assumptions? AFAIK, Intel has said absolutely nothing about the architecture of their Xe GPUs.

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