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Intel 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support Continues Being Prepped For The Next Linux Kernel

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  • Intel 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support Continues Being Prepped For The Next Linux Kernel

    Phoronix: Intel 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support Continues Being Prepped For The Next Linux Kernel

    Last month we covered early work being done on an Intel 2.5G Ethernet Linux driver. That "IGC" driver for Intel I225-LM/I225-V 2.5G Ethernet adapters didn't make it for Linux 4.19, but it looks like it will be on track for the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...rnet-Prep-4.20

  • #2
    Wikipedia says Gigabit Ethernet is with us since the year 2000. Almost all cheap crap had it for about 10 years now. And is sad that it successor (10G) have so many cost problems to get mass production. We have several high end motherboards with it, almost no laptops, PCIe cards cost a arm and a leg, switches/routers are still too rich for most people's blood. And that's it.

    This 2.5G is better than nothing, but it make me sad that something much better is already available, but most of us cannot justify the investment.

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    • #3
      There is also 5 Ggigabit Ethernet.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2.5GBASE-T_and_5GBASE-T

      If I don't remember wrong, I think Sun Microsystems open sourced a 10 GbE network card.

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      • #4
        It may be just me, but I believe we are in fact regressing a bit: a while ago I was looking for a new cheap Gigabit WiFi router and discovered they vanished! Manufactures now think Gig Ethernet is a feature for their most expensive shit. And to make that look more believable, you can find a lot of new mobos/laptops with only Fast Ethernet, in 2018!

        That only makes me more sad for bricking one of mine WR1043nd while trying to unstuck a DD-WRT install...
        Last edited by M@GOid; 09-17-2018, 07:50 AM.

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        • #5
          What we are looking here is the long awaited network upgrade finally coming to life.
          10G was too hard to implement because you needed rip out and replace all the CAT cables.

          So now we have multi-gig also known as 802.3bz . Should start flooding the mark soon with new cheap switches and nic's. can't wait.

          It uses existing cables and autosenses between 1/2.5/5/10 gig depending on NIC's and cable type (+length)

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          • #6
            This is one of the most disappointing aspects of the PC industry. I've been on gigabit ethernet for the entirety of my owning-computers-life. 10gig was also there for most of it, but was always cost prohibitive. Even now, the new adapters cost about $100!

            And now intel is taunting us with "2.5g". An improvement, yes, but server technology usually comes to consumers after a few years.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by M@GOid View Post
              Wikipedia says Gigabit Ethernet is with us since the year 2000. Almost all cheap crap had it for about 10 years now. And is sad that it successor (10G) have so many cost problems to get mass production. We have several high end motherboards with it, almost no laptops, PCIe cards cost a arm and a leg, switches/routers are still too rich for most people's blood. And that's it.

              This 2.5G is better than nothing, but it make me sad that something much better is already available, but most of us cannot justify the investment.
              10Gbps is tremendously overkill for the average PC, and is relatively new compared to 4Gbps NICs (which you can get for pretty cheap). That being said, there are a few high-end consumer-level boards with integrated 4Gbps ethernet. Sure, it's nowhere near as good as 10Gbps, but depending how many users are on your network, it's all the speed you're really going to need.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                10Gbps is tremendously overkill for the average PC, and is relatively new compared to 4Gbps NICs (which you can get for pretty cheap). That being said, there are a few high-end consumer-level boards with integrated 4Gbps ethernet. Sure, it's nowhere near as good as 10Gbps, but depending how many users are on your network, it's all the speed you're really going to need.
                It's all pointless unless you have a "4Gbps switch" though. I've only seen 10Gbps ones and they are in the 500$ range (the cheap 8-port ones), and still are usually racks so they WRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR with tiny high CFM fans.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  There is also 5 Ggigabit Ethernet.
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2.5GBASE-T_and_5GBASE-T

                  If I don't remember wrong, I think Sun Microsystems open sourced a 10 GbE network card.
                  I came to ask as well, I am worry that these drivers means Intel will only have controller support for 2.5Gbps and not 5Gbps.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by M@GOid View Post
                    It may be just me, but I believe we are in fact regressing a bit: a while ago I was looking for a new cheap Gigabit WiFi router and discovered they vanished! Manufactures now think Gig Ethernet is a feature for their most expensive shit. And to make that look more believable, you can find a lot of new mobos/laptops with only Fast Ethernet, in 2018!
                    Only the cheap laptops have Fast Ethernet (many laptops don't have any ethernet ports too), and there I can understand it, as 99% of the laptop users will never even see a ethernet cable in their home.

                    I've never seen a modern x86 mobo with Fast Ethernet from normal OEMs, can you make some examples? I'm curious.

                    I think the gigabit wifi router vanishing thing is local to your country, or some jackass is inflating prices of what is cheap in the rest of the world. I can get a new TP-link AC1200 for like 60 euros, on Ebay I can get loads of used gigabit stuff for 40 euros or so.

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