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Intel Publishes New DRM Driver For Their Arria 10 FPGA System

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  • Intel Publishes New DRM Driver For Their Arria 10 FPGA System

    Phoronix: Intel Publishes New DRM Driver For Their Arria 10 FPGA System

    An Intel engineer has published the "Intel FPGA Video and Image Processing Suite" DRM driver today for Linux. This Direct Rendering Manager is intended for use with their Arria 10 FPGA system when combined with Intel DisplayPort IP...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-FPGA-Arria-10

  • #2
    Why would anyone use an expensive FPGA board for graphics display on a monitor?

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    • #3
      I have no idea what this card is for

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      • #4
        Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
        I have no idea what this card is for
        Si tacuisses philosophus mansisses ...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
          I have no idea what this card is for
          FPGA cards are used for very very very fast floating point calculations, e.g. for physics simulation. A typical example is real-time calculation of electric currents, which can change too quicky for running the simulation normal CPUs. That's why I don't understand the use-case of connecting a monitor to an FPGA -- which is typically installed in the PCIe slot of a normal x86-amd64 host system anyway.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by elvenbone View Post
            Why would anyone use an expensive FPGA board for graphics display on a monitor?
            The exact board is most likely only used for prototyping, or for low volume use cases.

            Similar design, albeit much lower performance (ARMv7 hardcore, FPGA):
            - Siglent SDS1202X-E oscilloscope, Xilinx Zynq-7000 SoC
            - GW Instek oscilloscope, Xilinx case study: https://www.xilinx.com/publications/prod_mktg/zynq7000/goodwill-casestudy.pdf

            So anywhere where you do high data rate processing and want to show the results on a screen this is very useful.

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            • #7
              This card reminds me of early 1990s ISA cards, due to how long it is, and how many of the components on it look so big and chunky.

              Also, like StefanBruens said, FPGAs like this are usually for prototyping.

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              • #8
                Dunno, the "Arria 10 FPGA Development Kit is a PCI Express based board that allows for the full capabilities of the company's Arria 10 FPGA to be exploited" should have dropped an obvious hint that this is a devboard.

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