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Intel Linux Driver Gets Fleshed Out For 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support

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  • Intel Linux Driver Gets Fleshed Out For 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support

    Phoronix: Intel Linux Driver Gets Fleshed Out For 2.5G Ethernet Controller Support

    Taking shape on a branched version of the Linux kernel is the initial "IGC" driver providing support for Intel 2.5G Ethernet controllers...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...et-Linux-Drive

  • #2
    "while 10G+ is around (albeit not very common at least in consumer environments), 2.5G (and 5G) can still operate over existing CAT5E/CAT6 Ethernet cable while 10G speeds and higher cannot work with existing cabling. "

    Eh, not quite. 10G works fine over existing Cat6 and even Cat5e cabling. In fact, this is precisely why Cat6 was developed - to support 10G Ethernet over shorter distances up to 55m (35m if bundled). Not sure if 5e is officially supported, but I have used it up to 5 meters with no errors, so it definitely works. I have heard reports of success with unbundled 10G over cat5e up to 30m, which is surely more than most residential use cases will experience.

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    • #3
      That's why we have Cat 7 cables (outside USA)...

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      • #4
        Cool mode, I wonder what kind of distance 2.5/5GBASE-T works at over real Cat 5e, seems like 2.5 is intended to work out to "at least" 100m. It seems that these modes are intended largely to ease deployment of new Wi-Fi APs which have transmission rates in excess of 1Gbit/s, by allowing a large number of them to be upgraded without the cost of 10GBASE-T hardware, or in cases where 10GBASE-T is not possible over the installed runs (i.e. Cat 5e > ~40m).
        Last edited by microcode; 08-08-2018, 02:55 AM.

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        • #5
          The price of the Aquantia-based 10G cards is around $100 and they can do 2.5G and 5G if the line conditions do not allow 10G. So if such a card is not at least 50% cheaper then it's total waste.

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          • #6
            Hopefully this is a sign that consumer devices are going to start appearing with >1gbit capability. Some HEDT Motherboards are shipping with 10GigE ports but there isn't much choice when it comes to switches and routers without going to enterprise grade stuff.

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            • #7
              I recall a certain atom server chip which targeted 10 gigE, but motherboards also had the option of running 4x 1gig. I think the idea was that each of the 4 would actually support 2.5 gig (being a quarter of 10). This seems like they're getting around to that, but it was a couple of years ago that I saw that.

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