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Intel Xeon E-2100 Processors Released, Succeeds Xeon E3

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  • Intel Xeon E-2100 Processors Released, Succeeds Xeon E3

    Phoronix: Intel Xeon E-2100 Processors Released, Succeeds Xeon E3

    Intel rolled out today the Xeon E-2100 processors as the successor to the Xeon E3 CPUs. The Xeon E-2100 series is intended for entry-level workstations and based upon the Coffeelake CPU microarchitecture...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-E-2100-Series

  • #2
    > Up to *64GB* DDR4 ECC 2666MHz (according to https://newsroom.intel.com/news/new-...-workstations/)

    was expecting 128GB.
    Well, bye-bye.

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    • #3
      Only 64GB max ram, only 40 PCIe lanes, only 2MB of cache per core. Same thing they have been selling us for the past 4-5 years. And, of course, it probably also "features" Meltdown and Spectre.

      Intel is giving every chance for AMD to kick its ass once they start shipping Ryzen 2 based on GloFo's 7nm process. Just hope AMD won't drop the ball.

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      • #4
        For anyone that wants to complain about the support for "only 64GB" of ram, I think they are missing the point, these cpu's support Optane DIMM, which I believe will be a transformative technology once it arrives.

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        • #5
          Seems they are splitting the low end in two. There is the 16 core Atom which has the server features stripped off (for appliances they say), and now there is the E3, which retains the feature set but is crippled with low specifications. The Xeon-D, which was the low power server chip that could, but Intel wanted a kings ransom for it (to protect Xeon E5) and was fabbed along side the last gen Atom, which has been cancelled.

          Why do I feel like I am watching General Motors and their product blunders in the 1980's all over again?

          Next thing you know Intel will open a fab for the "low end" CPU market and call it Saturn, (cough, cough) sorry, they already did, it was called Atom.



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          • #6
            Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
            Seems they are splitting the low end in two. There is the 16 core Atom which has the server features stripped off (for appliances they say), and now there is the E3, which retains the feature set but is crippled with low specifications.
            If that means lower pricing, I could allow that. Knowing Intel, it's not going to lower prices that much.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by phoronix View Post
              40 lanes of PCI Express
              This is Intel misinformation. The actual CPU supports 16 lanes + a x4 DMI 3 connection, just like Coffee Lake desktop CPUs. The way they reach the "40" number is by putting a big switch in the chipset that fans out the x4 DMI3 lanes to x24.

              The total bandwidth between these 24 lanes and the CPU/memory is still limited to x4, so don't think you're going to have a big NVMe RAID in this thing or adding 100 Gbps NICs, etc.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Spooktra View Post
                For anyone that wants to complain about the support for "only 64GB" of ram, I think they are missing the point, these cpu's support Optane DIMM, which I believe will be a transformative technology once it arrives.
                Optane is a cookie while most people want a pie. There will be a lot of uncertainty on how it will work for give workload and thus if it's worth it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mbello View Post
                  Only 64GB max ram, only 40 PCIe lanes, only 2MB of cache per core. Same thing they have been selling us for the past 4-5 years. And, of course, it probably also "features" Meltdown and Spectre.

                  Intel is giving every chance for AMD to kick its ass once they start shipping Ryzen 2 based on GloFo's 7nm process. Just hope AMD won't drop the ball.
                  How do you expect them to increase the cache when the process node is the same (14nm)? There's no "architecture optimizations" available with the cache, literally all that matters is the node used. You think tech is magic or what?

                  People really love to whine about pointless crap all the time.

                  Here's a solution to your low memory/caching troubles: stop using pathetically bloated inefficient software.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hasn't always Xeon E (E3) been more or less an ECC-version of current desktop CPU? So it's not so surprising with the 64 GB limit. Of course, 128 GB or so would have been very nice.

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