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Open-Source HDCP Support Gets Extended To More Platforms

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  • Open-Source HDCP Support Gets Extended To More Platforms

    Phoronix: Open-Source HDCP Support Gets Extended To More Platforms

    With the Linux 4.17 kernel (not the upcoming 4.16 cycle) there is likely to be added initial HDCP support to Intel's Direct Rendering Manager driver. Ahead of that this High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection support continues getting improved upon...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...pport-Extended

  • #2
    Biggest question I have is can I turn HDCP on for normal content output. 1.4 hdcp is not that secure but does prevent radio based snooping. Also if dealing with a monitor with controller slightly unstable going a different path can sometimes temporary work around these problems.

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    • #3
      For sure it is technically possible on windows, as I've done it at work using in-house tool for screens driven by our hardware (and our driver). Hoverer it may not be easy for end user to do the same trick . Of course it may depend on the hardware and linux implementation.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
        Biggest question I have is can I turn HDCP on for normal content output. 1.4 hdcp is not that secure but does prevent radio based snooping. Also if dealing with a monitor with controller slightly unstable going a different path can sometimes temporary work around these problems.
        THAT is an interesting example of repurposing DRM code for another use, and of considerable interest to me. If this ever works on r600, it would be reason for me to get an HDMI/HDCP capable monitor.

        RF leakage from monitor cables (VGA is said to be the worst offender) is the most readable and usually strongest emission from a desktop, and many times reproducing content sent to the screen on a second system by reading this RF leakage has been demonstrated. Encrypting all content and sending it over an HDMI cable with existing HDCP code will stop any attacker not capable of cracking raw HDCP encrypted packets without the benefits of access to the hardware or keys stored on media. Remember that unlike DRM, since you did not distribute the content to the attacker with the intention of the attacker being able to "play" it, you never delivered a key. Weak spot would be if it is possible for an attacker to try all possible HDCP keys before the information becomes too old to be useful.

        This exact form of attack as well as the security camera threat to laptop/mobile users are among the reasons passphrases are not echoed to the screen by default. This could be a damned useful solution if we can get enough control of HDCP to send it keys and encrypt all data sent to the screen, all of the time. Then we need something similar for the keyboard, perhaps via a wireless keyboard modified to use a shielded cable between itself and its USB dongle, and reflashed with firmware allowing for strong encryption.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
          Biggest question I have is can I turn HDCP on for normal content output. 1.4 hdcp is not that secure but does prevent radio based snooping. Also if dealing with a monitor with controller slightly unstable going a different path can sometimes temporary work around these problems.
          Another one of life's simple pleasures ruined by security. What are we supposed to do for fun now? Go magnet fishing?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
            Another one of life's simple pleasures ruined by security. What are we supposed to do for fun now? Go magnet fishing?
            Don't worry... as one door closes another one opens.

            Drones are continuing to become smaller and quieter, so pretty soon you should be able to obtain screen data by looking over the user's shoulder

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bridgman View Post
              Don't worry... as one door closes another one opens.

              Drones are continuing to become smaller and quieter, so pretty soon you should be able to obtain screen data by looking over the user's shoulder
              https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/c20...6c053530c2.pdf

              You are ignoring reflections off objects. So it is possible to read the screen a person is looking at by the reflections in the person eyes.

              Line of sight and reflections has shorter range electromagnetic waves from HDMI or display-port. Issue to remember there is signal loss due to how weak the signal is and encryption/compression makes the matter way worse for those snooping electromagnetically to the point that they know they are getting a signal but too much is missing to decode it.

              HDCP does make sense for a lot of usages outside content protection for companies. End users need content protection of their content as well.

              A drone only has to get inside 500 meters if there is no shielding in way to start performing electromagnetic snooping. Now looking over someone shoulder you have got a lot closer if person is in doors. .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

                https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/c20...6c053530c2.pdf

                You are ignoring reflections off objects. So it is possible to read the screen a person is looking at by the reflections in the person eyes.

                Line of sight and reflections has shorter range electromagnetic waves from HDMI or display-port. Issue to remember there is signal loss due to how weak the signal is and encryption/compression makes the matter way worse for those snooping electromagnetically to the point that they know they are getting a signal but too much is missing to decode it.

                HDCP does make sense for a lot of usages outside content protection for companies. End users need content protection of their content as well.

                A drone only has to get inside 500 meters if there is no shielding in way to start performing electromagnetic snooping. Now looking over someone shoulder you have got a lot closer if person is in doors. .
                While you make a point, and raise the question regarding goggles/glasses for a display, you missed Bridgemans sarcasm regarding the 'benefits' of drone tech being simple to access

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

                  While you make a point, and raise the question regarding goggles/glasses for a display, you missed Bridgemans sarcasm regarding the 'benefits' of drone tech being simple to access
                  Yes he was being saracam but you are forgot a drone does not have to use optical.

                  Just because you are sending something out a HDMI port does not mean it will be travelling down copper.

                  http://www.ebay.com.au/gds/Transmitt...7318252/g.html

                  So not having ability to encrypting HDMI output means a drone only has to get inside 500m-1km depending on setup to receive the output on a software define radio with the correct amps and filters that can be in drone payload. This drone does not need to be small its far enough away that you can barely see it.

                  The reality the gear required to radio snoop is also getting very easy to access and lot more security risk when combined with drones.

                  HDCP encryption need to be open for usage for general screen output particular of when that screen output is going over wireless links. You cannot tell from the information reported to HDMI port that you have a wireless link other than lag.

                  Now that is design issue with HDCP 2.2 if lag is too high HDCP will not connect.

                  Reality is this problem is nothing to joke about.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
                    Reality is this problem is nothing to joke about.
                    Yes and no... definitely a real concern but I don't think that precludes joking about it.

                    I find some of the best ideas start with a joke that in turn gets you thinking about other ideas which turn out to be valuable.

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