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AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers

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  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers

    Phoronix: AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers

    There's more Radeon Linux excitement today beyond AMD finally open-sourcing their Vulkan driver. Coming out today is the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 driver that bundles in the open-source RADV and RadeonSI drivers too, in letting you "mix and match" the driver components you want for your system.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=25640

  • #2
    today is the AMDay

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    • #3
      Is this with non-pro-amdgpu kernel module in DKMS?
      Does ROCm work without -pro?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ernstp View Post
        Is this with non-pro-amdgpu kernel module in DKMS?
        Does ROCm work without -pro?
        If my memory serves me, they are using the same DKMS kernel module but no option of using the non-pro-patched DKMS module.
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #5
          Is it now feasible to install the pro OpenGL driver alongside mesa and use one or the other like with Vulkan?

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          • #6
            This is getting so complicated! I think I need a fucking flowchart to understand all the options.

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            • #7
              When it comes to using the open-source driver stack as found in AMDGPU-PRO 17.50, they are basing it on Mesa 17.2.4. This is better than what is found out-of-the-box on older Ubuntu/RHEL releases, but a bit unfortunate it's not using the brand new Mesa 17.3.0 release or some Git snapshot.
              Sometimes I wonder what goes into certain people minds which otherwise look normal. Git snapshot. In an official supported driver. To customers.

              Overall this is an interesting approach for AMDGPU-PRO moving forward. As a reminder though, AMDGPU-PRO officially remains limited to the enterprise/LTS distributions so if for example you are on Ubuntu 17.10, for now you do not have any AMDGPU-PRO driver support
              Since there is no stable ABI, that is the realistically next best approach for a company that wants to play nice with the open source madness and stay responsible and sane.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gnarlin View Post
                This is getting so complicated! I think I need a fucking flowchart to understand all the options.
                Very true. I'm glad that their is "some" progress in AMD open-source development, but this driver situation is one big unacceptable mess (from gamer perspective). Some games will work with AMD open-source drivers only. Some games will work on AMD proprietary drivers only. Some games will work on both, but on one or another - there will be some bugs/artefacts or performance issues.

                So what user need to do? Test EVERY single game with both drivers and choose driver per app. If I understand correctly there is still no easy way to switch AMD drivers "online" (i.e. without logoff and/or reboot), so... User every time when want to play game1 (compatible with open-source driver only) need to install driver1 (open-source) and reboot computer. When user wants to play game2 (works better with proprietary) - install driver2 (proprietary) and reboot computer... Insane.

                So, unfortunately, AMD is still quite weak alternative for nVidia. At least for Linux gamers that are not open-source fanatics and want games to "just work" without reboots. Not to mention that AMD performance is also worse - no matter open or proprietary driver.


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                • #9
                  Personally, I'm just going to use whatever comes with the distro, already set up. Probably that means RadeonSI for OpenGL and RADV for Vulkan. I like playing games now and then, but I'm not really a hardcore 'gamer'. So if a game doesn't work well with these drivers, I'll simply not play it until (a) it is better optimized, or (b) RadeonSI/RADV are improved.

                  Unless one driver happens to be tremendously better than the other, I will stick with the Mesa-based stuff.

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                  • #10
                    On my older system the difference between Ubuntu's stock mesa 17.2.4+llvm5 vs oibaf's+llvm 5 is only a few fps. Padoka with llvm 6 is about 6 fps faster on average.
                    Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety,deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
                    Ben Franklin 1755

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