Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ryzen system with AMD RAID.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    But first it has to see the disk ;-) And that is where that SATA mode comes in play. If you put SATA in RAID mode kernel will not see the disks at all.

    Comment


    • #12
      Why not use a NAS for your solution? It looks much more reliable to me in your case. For a cheaper solution, windows dynamic disks is another possibility, which is also supported in linux with ldmtool.

      Comment


      • #13
        In that case, the SATA driver may just be missing the necessary device IDs for the AMD RAID controller.
        Code:
        lspci -nnk
        may tell what you need to add to your kernel drivers/ata/ahci.c

        Comment


        • #14
          HI,

          thanks for the suggestion. In my case during the install process I use stock kernel that comes with RHEL/CentOS install ISO. I really don't want to deal with kernel source code and make changes. I'm looking for a solution that works out of the box. In my case that is with AMD driver that is supposed to drive this RAID array, but for some reason complaints that it's current license is not compatible with my array configuration.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by doychin View Post
            HI,

            I use stock kernel that comes with RHEL/CentOS install ISO. I really don't want to deal with kernel source code and make changes
            RHEL uses years old buggy and slow code. A rolling release os with a custom non debug 1000Hz timer kernel is many seconds faster (at boot) and way more stable. Use Debian testing Xfce and make a custom kernel package with drivers/ata/ahci.c fixes.

            https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...in-living-room

            When you have new hardware like Ryzen, it is really stupid to use static distributions. It is the same if you used win7 instead of win10.

            If our instructions are not ok for you, use win virus hoover then and keep away from the forum wasting our time.
            Last edited by debianxfce; 08-17-2017, 10:45 AM.

            Comment


            • #16
              Hi debianxfce,

              It is not me who is wasting your time. I just asked my question. You were the first to jump on it spilling all that "win virus" crap and insisting that all should use Debian. If you think you are wasting your time it is up to you not to answer the question.

              Sorry but I'm not biased about Windows. I use both Windows and Linux for the last 15 years because I do develop applications that should run on both platforms. Sometimes it is important to use not the latest but the most stable environment. You don't need to waste time playing with patches and compiling kernels just to do some simple job. You just need a stable distribution with long term updates to do your job.

              Thanks any way for your responses
              Have a nice day.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by doychin View Post
                I do develop applications that should run on both platforms.
                Me too are compiling kernel and building distribution for amd64 and arm64 platforms. I do not even try to test arm64 code in my development pc. I test it with a Amlogic S912 tvbox. For you ,running virus hoover in the VirtualBox could be much more practical than dual booting.

                Originally posted by doychin View Post
                Hi debianxfce,
                You just need a stable distribution with long term updates to do your job.
                Debian testing has rolled since year 2000 and there is no end of support seen. You can update it like every day, if you want.Stable distributions are not stable, especially with the new hardware. Do you not read the news:
                http://www.computerweekly.com/blog/O...t-into-airlock
                Last edited by debianxfce; 08-17-2017, 11:06 AM.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Since this thread is one of the top results for searching for Ryzen Linux raid, and It doesn't seem to have any helpful information, I thought I'd share my experience and lend a hand. My experience was on a Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming K5.

                  First off, I ran into the same problem doychin did with the kernel log entry "rcraid: Array * not allowed by current licence level". Unfortunately, setting anything to legacy on the motherboard will result in the rcraid driver not working. You need to get your motherboard to boot from a pure UEFI, with no CSM support. To do this, I needed to set, under the BIOS tab, the "Windows 10 Features" option from OtherOS to Windows 10, which opens up the CSM support option, which can now be set to Disabled. (Make sure your Graphics card can boot from a pure UEFI environment, I tried setting this with an older card, and the BIOS would automatically turn CSM back on after rebooting.) Set the "Storage Boot Option Control" to "UEFI Only", as well as "Other PCI Device ROM Priority". With these settings in place, after a reboot into the UEFI, you should now have access to the RAID controller under the "Peripherals" tab, with the label "RAIDXpert2 Configuration". Configure your drive arrays, and then boot your distro of choice, while following the directions for injecting the driver into the kernel.
                  Second, with the controller in raid mode, it will only boot from Array 1. If you planned to boot from multiple arrays, you will need to change which array is array 1 in the RAIDXpert2 Configuration option in the UEFI. If you plan to have GRUB handle booting both linux and Windows, you might not need to do this, but for those with multiple separate boot drives, this is a moderate annoyance.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Since this thread is one of the top results for searching for Ryzen Linux raid, and It doesn't seem to have any helpful information, I thought I'd share my experience and lend a hand. My experience was on a Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming K5.

                    First off, I ran into the same problem doychin did with the kernel log entry "rcraid: Array * not allowed by current licence level". Unfortunately, trying to use the legacy RAID BIOS on the motherboard will result in the rcraid driver not working. You need to get your motherboard to boot from a pure UEFI, with no CSM support. To do this, I needed to set, under the BIOS tab, the "Windows 10 Features" option from OtherOS to Windows 10, which opens up the CSM support option, which can now be set to Disabled. (Make sure your Graphics card can boot from a pure UEFI environment, I tried setting this with an older card, and the BIOS would automatically turn CSM back on after rebooting.) Set the "Storage Boot Option Control" to "UEFI Only", as well as "Other PCI Device ROM Priority". With these settings in place, after a reboot into the UEFI, you should now have access to the RAID controller under the "Peripherals" tab, with the label "RAIDXpert2 Configuration". Configure your drive arrays, and then boot your distro of choice, while following the directions for injecting the driver into the kernel.

                    Second, with the controller in raid mode, it will only boot from Array 1. If you planned to boot from multiple arrays, you will need to change which array is array 1 in the RAIDXpert2 Configuration option in the UEFI. If you plan to have GRUB handle booting both linux and Windows, you might not need to do this, but for those with multiple separate boot drives, this is a moderate annoyance.

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      I had this same problem when trying to migrate off a Piledriver-based system. Long story short, don't use the legacy RAID boot ROM,. You need to disable CSM and run the board in pure UEFI mode.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X