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AMD Begins Cutting Prices On Ryzen CPUs

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  • AMD Begins Cutting Prices On Ryzen CPUs

    Phoronix: AMD Begins Cutting Prices On Ryzen CPUs

    If you have been waiting to pick up an AMD Ryzen CPU until the prices drop, they are beginning to do so...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...zen-Price-Cuts

  • #2
    Intel works for me the graphics drivers are great.
    AMD doesn't have any compelling offers, Ryzen doesn't even have a integrated GPU, so until the next Ryzen comes with integrated GPU it remains uninteresting for me.
    However, the next Ryzen might be very interesting because AMD are good at graphics and Intel have been slacking, the Kaby Lake GPU performance is not much improved since Haswell.

    I would still be reluctant to switch over to AMD unless they offered open source BSP, FSP, firmware, etc.
    AMD is just as proprietary as Intel with their closed source binary blobs and Intel AMT, Intel ME, and such.

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    • #3
      Please don't bring individual experiences into this.
      I could do very well without an IGP at home and when building a computer for work an IGP will do just fine. Buy what you want and be thankful there are more choices than a year ago.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Intel works for me the graphics drivers are great.
        AMD doesn't have any compelling offers, Ryzen doesn't even have a integrated GPU, so until the next Ryzen comes with integrated GPU it remains uninteresting for me.
        Note that the current Ryzen CPUs are meant to compete with Intel CPUs that also lack a iGPU like most of socket 2011 stuff, so you are comparing apples with bananas here.

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        • #5
          Same here, happily using 6800k without iGPU and will likely switch to AMD next time I upgrade my system if price/performance ration will be better.
          Regardless, we all win from competition as end users, so I'm very happy to see Intel dropping their prices and now AMD pushing it further.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Intel works for me the graphics drivers are great.
            AMD doesn't have any compelling offers, Ryzen doesn't even have a integrated GPU, so until the next Ryzen comes with integrated GPU it remains uninteresting for me.
            However, the next Ryzen might be very interesting because AMD are good at graphics and Intel have been slacking, the Kaby Lake GPU performance is not much improved since Haswell.

            I would still be reluctant to switch over to AMD unless they offered open source BSP, FSP, firmware, etc.
            AMD is just as proprietary as Intel with their closed source binary blobs and Intel AMT, Intel ME, and such.
            Having an integrated gpu is a malus in Intel's case certainly not a bonus.
            You're paying about 340$ for a piace of silicon of around 122mm2 ( i7 7700k ) and a third of that area (and so the price) is to pay the gpu..
            I'd rather pay 120$ less and buy a 20 $ discrete card.
            The igpu Intel stuffs in almost all its cpus it's quite pricey (and with crappy performances, only good for old games).
            It only makes sense in <$100 cpus and thin laptops.
            Last edited by sonnet; 06-02-2017, 08:04 AM.

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            • #7
              I'm thrilled that the desktop CPU market is competitive again.

              But frankly, since I don't game I don't plan on buying anything. My desktop CPU is seven years old, and it drives Firefox, Chrome, git, gcc, and the JVM just fine. I'll replace it when it bites the dust.

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              • #8
                I fully expect that this is a more permanent price drop and that they're compressing their pricing structure in order to ensure better product segmentation to make higher margin Ryzen 7 parts worth buying over the bottom tier lower margin Threadripper parts. given the fairly safe assumption that Threadripper will sit in the $600-1k segment

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
                  I'm thrilled that the desktop CPU market is competitive again.

                  But frankly, since I don't game I don't plan on buying anything. My desktop CPU is seven years old, and it drives Firefox, Chrome, git, gcc, and the JVM just fine. I'll replace it when it bites the dust.
                  You're exactly the target audience of Ryzen 7 and Threadripper, these are a dream come true for anyone doing dev or prosumer work, although I've got a strong feeling that the number of cores is going to double for gen 2 by making each die 4x CCX (and thus solving the quad channel and PCI-e lane issue while they're at it) since the jump to 7nm will provide them with plenty of room to do so.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                    Intel works for me the graphics drivers are great.
                    AMD doesn't have any compelling offers, Ryzen doesn't even have a integrated GPU, so until the next Ryzen comes with integrated GPU it remains uninteresting for me.
                    Thanks for your input. Very important.

                    I would still be reluctant to switch over to AMD unless they offered open source BSP, FSP, firmware, etc.
                    AMD is just as proprietary as Intel with their closed source binary blobs and Intel AMT, Intel ME, and such.
                    When those firmwares are enabling a hardware functionality, what's the problem? A lot of hardware needs microcontrollers (or is just a special CPU/MPU/DSP) implementing the specialist function, rather than pure silicon (very costly, and often just not necessary). The code could have been put on a ROM, but then it's not updatable.

                    What is a problem is the user-space drivers being open or not, and AMD (and Intel) do very well here.

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