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CPUFreq vs. P-State CPU Scaling Governor Tests On Various Vulkan/OpenGL Games

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  • CPUFreq vs. P-State CPU Scaling Governor Tests On Various Vulkan/OpenGL Games

    Phoronix: CPUFreq vs. P-State CPU Scaling Governor Tests On Various Vulkan/OpenGL Games

    With the recent release of some new Linux games like the Serious Sam 2017 update and Max Max, also with featuring Vulkan renderers, here are some fresh Intel P-State vs. ACPI CPUFreq frequency scaling driver and governor comparisons with a variety of Linux games.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=24479

  • #2
    In Fedora and Ubuntu, I realized that P-state always loves to throttle up to the maximum frequency at the drop of a hat, regardless of whether the workload in question actually benefits from the high frequency.

    And even when idling, P-state never actually idles at the processor's lowest possible frequency. The lowest my processor can go is 400MHz, but the idling is always somewhere around the 500MHz region.

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    • #3
      Would be great to see this on Ryzen. Would also like to see the actual wattage at idle between the different governors.

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      • #4
        why no schedutil?

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        • #5
          Gaming computer should be optimized, right? Cpu freq governor is an optional feature of the Linux kernel. Desktop pc bioses have those features, so optimal gaming pc uses bios and disables unneeded kernel features.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by davidbepo View Post
            why no schedutil?
            Because it wasn't in the Ubuntu 16.10 kernel...
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              I've been using schedutil... seems more flexible than ondemand.

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              • #8
                Michael Sorry, typo:

                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                Tesseract is a game that does tend to be impacted much more by changes in the CPU scaling driver/governo than other games.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                  In Fedora and Ubuntu, I realized that P-state always loves to throttle up to the maximum frequency at the drop of a hat, regardless of whether the workload in question actually benefits from the high frequency.

                  And even when idling, P-state never actually idles at the processor's lowest possible frequency. The lowest my processor can go is 400MHz, but the idling is always somewhere around the 500MHz region.
                  Yeah. Same here with my Kaby Lake laptop. If you run powertop, you can observe cpufreq parks the cores and keeps them mostly in the lowerst power configurations (package included) with is S10, I think. Pstate won't go lower than S6 or something like that.

                  There's a reason why Dell ships their Ubuntu laptops with cpufreq instead of pstate.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                    In Fedora and Ubuntu, I realized that P-state always loves to throttle up to the maximum frequency at the drop of a hat, regardless of whether the workload in question actually benefits from the high frequency.

                    And even when idling, P-state never actually idles at the processor's lowest possible frequency. The lowest my processor can go is 400MHz, but the idling is always somewhere around the 500MHz region.
                    Dell ships their laptops with cpufreq instead of pstate. Makes sense, right?

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