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LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

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  • LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

    Phoronix: LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

    The latest LLVM and Clang compiler code as of this morning now has support for Zen (AMD Ryzen) processors...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...znver1-Zen-CPU

  • #2
    Can't wait to see compiler tests with this CPU...
    And general tests. Too bad I can't afford it anytime soon

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dimko View Post
      Can't wait to see compiler tests with this CPU...
      And general tests. Too bad I can't afford it anytime soon
      There's no need to feel bad about your situation. At least you don't have to throw out and replace more than half of your computer to upgrade to one...

      Back in 2014 when I was building myself my current desktop I realized how badly Intel had stagnated when I looked how little performance difference there was to between 2011 parts like the 2500k and then current parts like the 4670k and how this had lead to second hand 2500 and 2600k:s becoming so expensive you may have just bought a brand new equivalent. Because of this I just bought a second hand i7 950 (as I was planning on doing multi GPU compute work so all I needed on the CPU front was many hardware threads) with some pretty badly overspec:ed DDR3 RAM for a 2010 CPU thinking Intel would release a worthy upgrade in the next year. Oh boy was I wrong as I'm right now using that same setup, except with an overclock for the CPU and the RAM brought closer to spec at 1600MHz (they're advertised as 1866MHz capable, but the machine gets unstable at boot when you go beyond 1600 MHz).

      Not only do I have to throw out or pawn off the CPU, motherboard and RAM (as Zen only supports DDR4 RAM), I'm also going to have to replace the big heatsink CPU cooler that I thought I was going to be able to keep when cooler makers were still saying the AM4 socket would be compatible with AM3 coolers. Hell, while I'm at it I might as well replace the case (the Bitfenix Neos turns out has diabolically bad cooling unless you un-block one of the front fans by cutting out ether the 2,5" or 3,5" disc drive trays with a pair of tin snips) and the PSU (non-modular PSUs sure know how to become a real mess in a case without a space for unused connectors).
      Last edited by L_A_G; 01-10-2017, 01:46 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by L_A_G View Post
        I looked how little performance difference there was to between 2011 parts like the 2500k and then current parts like the 4670k
        4670k is no current part, it is Haswell:
        Sandy Bridge (you are here), Ivy Bridge, Haswell, (Devil's Canyon,) Broadwell, Skylake, Kaby Lake

        But that does even make it worse, of course

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dimko View Post
          Can't wait to see compiler tests with this CPU...
          And general tests. Too bad I can't afford it anytime soon
          Hey we all have priorities for our cash. Frankly I'm pretty excited about ZEN but like you have other priorities. I have to do it but I may have to resort to lots of overtime.

          One good point rushing to ZEN probably doesn't make a lot os sense unless you like to experiment with the bleeding edge. By the looks of thing right now you will need a next generation distro to run Linux fully supported on ZEN. The fact that ZEN support is just coming to LLVM sort of highlights how bleeding edge we are at the moment.

          Oh yes I want to see testing of this platform Intel needs real competition with respect to CPU performance and I'm hoping ZEN lives up to the rumors.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by wizard69 View Post

            Hey we all have priorities for our cash. Frankly I'm pretty excited about ZEN but like you have other priorities. I have to do it but I may have to resort to lots of overtime.

            One good point rushing to ZEN probably doesn't make a lot os sense unless you like to experiment with the bleeding edge. By the looks of thing right now you will need a next generation distro to run Linux fully supported on ZEN. The fact that ZEN support is just coming to LLVM sort of highlights how bleeding edge we are at the moment.

            Oh yes I want to see testing of this platform Intel needs real competition with respect to CPU performance and I'm hoping ZEN lives up to the rumors.
            This only matters if you want to compile a binary specifically targeting Zen. Almost no distributions do this, but compile to a generic x86_64 architecture that will run on many CPUs. The closest would be Clear Linux, but even they don't target the bleeding edge Intel chips, but go back to 4th gen Core series: https://clearlinux.org/documentation..._hardware.html

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            • #7
              Originally posted by juno View Post

              4670k is no current part, it is Haswell:
              Sandy Bridge (you are here), Ivy Bridge, Haswell, (Devil's Canyon,) Broadwell, Skylake, Kaby Lake

              But that does even make it worse, of course
              Should probably have further emphasized that it was a current part back then in 2014 when I was planning the machine and ordering parts for it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by L_A_G View Post

                There's no need to feel bad about your situation. At least you don't have to throw out and replace more than half of your computer to upgrade to one...

                Back in 2014 when I was building myself my current desktop I realized how badly Intel had stagnated when I looked how little performance difference there was to between 2011 parts like the 2500k and then current parts like the 4670k and how this had lead to second hand 2500 and 2600k:s becoming so expensive you may have just bought a brand new equivalent. Because of this I just bought a second hand i7 950 (as I was planning on doing multi GPU compute work so all I needed on the CPU front was many hardware threads) with some pretty badly overspec:ed DDR3 RAM for a 2010 CPU thinking Intel would release a worthy upgrade in the next year. Oh boy was I wrong as I'm right now using that same setup, except with an overclock for the CPU and the RAM brought closer to spec at 1600MHz (they're advertised as 1866MHz capable, but the machine gets unstable at boot when you go beyond 1600 MHz).

                Not only do I have to throw out or pawn off the CPU, motherboard and RAM (as Zen only supports DDR4 RAM), I'm also going to have to replace the big heatsink CPU cooler that I thought I was going to be able to keep when cooler makers were still saying the AM4 socket would be compatible with AM3 coolers. Hell, while I'm at it I might as well replace the case (the Bitfenix Neos turns out has diabolically bad cooling unless you un-block one of the front fans by cutting out ether the 2,5" or 3,5" disc drive trays with a pair of tin snips) and the PSU (non-modular PSUs sure know how to become a real mess in a case without a space for unused connectors).
                Or you build a second system, have two compute node systems for OpenCL, and in my case, Rendering for Blender and other work. Then again, the AM4 socket will be the same for years to come, unlike Intel's merry-go-round of new socket pin configurations which means new Motherboard, each and every time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by L_A_G View Post
                  Not only do I have to throw out or pawn off the CPU, motherboard and RAM (as Zen only supports DDR4 RAM)
                  you have to throw away your ram anyway to replace it with dimms of higher capacity. and ddr4 can be twice as fast. and if you check specs of new motherboards, you will want to throw away your old one too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
                    Or you build a second system, have two compute node systems for OpenCL, and in my case, Rendering for Blender and other work. Then again, the AM4 socket will be the same for years to come, unlike Intel's merry-go-round of new socket pin configurations which means new Motherboard, each and every time.
                    I really have no need for two systems to be used side-by-side when most of the time I've spent working with compute stuff has been the typical modify-test-modify-test-modify-test cycle where the intended user of the software I've written is a third party (in my case they've always been government research organizations). Whenever I've run any large data set, i.e when it would be advantageous to have a separate "compute box", it's been specifically to check on how well the application is coping with it.

                    It would be nice if AMD can repeat what they've previously done with CPU sockets and allow you to minimize the number of components you have to replace when you replace your CPU or motherboard.

                    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                    you have to throw away your ram anyway to replace it with dimms of higher capacity. and ddr4 can be twice as fast. and if you check specs of new motherboards, you will want to throw away your old one too.
                    Sure, DDR4 offers much higher memory bandwidth than DDR3 (the latency advantage is much lesser thou), but when most of your compute load is worked on from device (GPU) memory it doesn't make all that big of a difference when all you gain is a second or two whenever you read data from or results to RAM.

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