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Allwinner A64 Support Being Worked On For Mainline Kernel

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  • Allwinner A64 Support Being Worked On For Mainline Kernel

    Phoronix: Allwinner A64 Support Being Worked On For Mainline Kernel

    Many Phoronix readers have been intrigued by the Pine A64, a Kickstarter project for manufacturing the first $15 ARM 64-bit single-board computer. That cheap ARM64 SBC is powered by the Allwinner A64 SoC and the good news is that there's work underway on allowing for mainline Linux kernel support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...4-Mainline-RFC

  • #2
    Again specific code needs to be developped for one SBC.
    ARM needs to get a platform specification in place to avoid such nonsense. And the device tree's unsustainable growth.

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    • #3
      I dont understand of this pricing, there are lots of bla, bla, bla.. about $5 socs but real prices for it is around $30 bucks - Orange Pi, Banana Pi, Rapsberry all are about $30 bucks..

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ruthan View Post
        I dont understand of this pricing, there are lots of bla, bla, bla.. about $5 socs but real prices for it is around $30 bucks - Orange Pi, Banana Pi, Rapsberry all are about $30 bucks..
        Not sure what you're saying. The SOC cost is what manufacturers pay in larger quantities. You don't build systems without RAM and peripherals though. The Pine 64 is $29 if you want 2GB of RAM, but if you're willing to settle for less, you can get it for less.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ruthan View Post
          I dont understand of this pricing, there are lots of bla, bla, bla.. about $5 socs but real prices for it is around $30 bucks - Orange Pi, Banana Pi, Rapsberry all are about $30 bucks..
          Orange Pi PC is $15.

          So yes, Orange Pi PC is $30 if you include SD cards, charger, usb cables, hdmi cables, wifi dongle, bt dongle, UART TTL dongle, few leds

          Raspberry Pi is $30, the board.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ruthan View Post
            I dont understand of this pricing, there are lots of bla, bla, bla.. about $5 socs but real prices for it is around $30 bucks - Orange Pi, Banana Pi, Rapsberry all are about $30 bucks..
            Come this is The rocket science! A SOC is a component on a board, a board that has many other components.

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            • #7
              This is all nice and well but according to this [1] it uses a Mali GPU for which there are no open drivers. You will also probably be stuck with some outdated kernel version if you want to have HW video decoding, much like what happens with the cubieboard, because the current mainline kernel does not have anything related to the video engine, see [2].

              [1] https://olimex.wordpress.com/2015/06...y-5-in-volume/
              [2] http://linux-sunxi.org/Linux_mainlin...ifficult_Tasks

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              • #8
                Just got the 2GB version, the NVIDIA tegra X1 is too expensive. I will use it as an ultra low power mini server running 24x7 so I don't care about the GPU.

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                • #9
                  I ***MUCH*** prefer to pay a bit more for (a) quality, (b) support, (c) code.
                  96boards people.
                  They currently have two boards available from THREE vendors. One a Qualcomm 4xA53, the other a HiSilicon 8xA53.
                  And three more boards on their way;
                  A Marvell (probably 4xA53), Actions bubblegum (4xA53),

                  and....

                  The AMD Huskyboard!
                  In the "EE" configuration
                  8xA57


                  96boards is Linaro. A certain portion of source code is a mandatory part of it.


                  I've been working with the Qualcomm board. It is VERY nice dealing with "upstream" on this. There are people at qualcomm and people at linaro *jumping* to support you. Including things like implementing new features in source code.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                    I've been working with the Qualcomm board. It is VERY nice dealing with "upstream" on this. There are people at qualcomm and people at linaro *jumping* to support you. Including things like implementing new features in source code.
                    I've been considering one of those for some time now. How's the GPU support on the 410? And how's the temperature control - much throttling? And what's the shutdown temp of the SoC, and does it get anywhere near it under stress?

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