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Intel Core i5 6500: A Great Skylake CPU For $200, Works Well On Linux

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  • Intel Core i5 6500: A Great Skylake CPU For $200, Works Well On Linux

    Phoronix: Intel Core i5 6500: A Great Skylake CPU For $200, Works Well On Linux

    With Skylake's retail availability improving, we're starting to see more of the Skylake processors in stock besides just the i5-6600K and i7-6700K. One of the other processors now widely available is the Core i5 6500, which is a step down from the Core i5 6600K, but retails at just $199 USD -- making it an attractive offer for many building new PCs and trying to stick to a decent budget. I've been testing out an i5-6500 under Ubuntu Linux and so far this processor with HD Graphics 530 is running well and offers compelling CPU performance relative to older Intel hardware as well as AMD's APU/CPU competition.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=22252

  • #2
    Still no way to get your hands on the i7-6700K in the US? I ordered one today, should arrive this week if the seller didn't lie about availability...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nils_ View Post
      Still no way to get your hands on the i7-6700K in the US? I ordered one today, should arrive this week if the seller didn't lie about availability...
      You can easily find it in stock now in the US.... But the new Intel PR person says they don't have any new sample availability yet.... Nor any ETA when he can get me a sample. But at its current cost, rather steep to buy for testing, but at least there's these newer SKL chips like the i5-6500 that are cheaper and haven't seen any formal reviews elsewhere of it, so bought it.
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        Basically you can see there is no need to upgrade from a i5-4670. Btw. if want a "fixed" Skylake CPU with working SGX you have to wait till 26th october and look at the SR2Lx code on it. Maybe Linux can show this as feature too...

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        • #5
          Thanks Michael, good choice of procs, clear and complete

          Just one question : why are pentium, i3 and AMD cpu not tested for video benchmarks?
          Are the games/tests not running well or due to a lack of time?

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          • #6
            No link with referral code to Amazon?
            linux addict, got the scars, the grey beard and the t-shirt.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by speculatrix View Post
              No link with referral code to Amazon?
              End of article.
              Michael Larabel
              http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Passso View Post
                Thanks Michael, good choice of procs, clear and complete

                Just one question : why are pentium, i3 and AMD cpu not tested for video benchmarks?
                Are the games/tests not running well or due to a lack of time?
                As mentioned in article, due to lack of time.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Maybe you could do some real video tests like HEVC with 4k and 8 bit / 10 bit, use mpv git code - can be used with --hwdec vaapi or vdpau, and test GTX 950, 960, some AMD cards (somehow even the oldest show HEVC support with vdpauinfo, which is definitely wrong). Intel can decode 8 bit only with vaapi, so maybe parse if the decoder is really used, the rest is checking the cpu usage. But use some real high rate files - it is useless to test low bitrates, those will not be used for live tv/bluray hd anyway. That's why the VP9 test was so completely useless that somebody posted some time ago. I would test 50/80 mbit/s files - best captures from real TV stations.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kano View Post
                    Maybe you could do some real video tests like HEVC with 4k and 8 bit / 10 bit, use mpv git code - can be used with --hwdec vaapi or vdpau, and test GTX 950, 960, some AMD cards (somehow even the oldest show HEVC support with vdpauinfo, which is definitely wrong). Intel can decode 8 bit only with vaapi, so maybe parse if the decoder is really used, the rest is checking the cpu usage. But use some real high rate files - it is useless to test low bitrates, those will not be used for live tv/bluray hd anyway. That's why the VP9 test was so completely useless that somebody posted some time ago. I would test 50/80 mbit/s files - best captures from real TV stations.
                    Contributions of new test profiles (or even bash scripts I can adapt) are always welcome.
                    Michael Larabel
                    http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                    Comment

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