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Comparing Today's Modern CPUs To Intel's Socket 478 Celeron & Pentium 4 NetBurst CPUs

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  • Comparing Today's Modern CPUs To Intel's Socket 478 Celeron & Pentium 4 NetBurst CPUs

    Phoronix: Comparing Today's Modern CPUs To Intel's Socket 478 Celeron & Pentium 4 NetBurst CPUs

    With Phoronix having turned 11 years old last week, there's been several interesting articles looking at the historical performance of Linux, large GPU/driver comparisons, etc. Today is arguably the most interesting birthday article yet. I dug out an old Intel Socket 478 system with the i875p Canterwood chipset and Pentium 4 and Celeron CPUs that still manage to power up. I compared the Linux performance of this 11+ year old system to a variety of today's x86 and ARM systems. Beyond looking at the raw performance, the performance-per-Watt was also measured to make for a very interesting look at how CPU performance has evolved over the past decade.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=21751

  • #2
    IMHO you have to use the best CPU available in every class of CPUs. Example: pentium 4, best CPU monocore = pentium 4 670/672 and so on.

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    • #3
      When I was putting together my pfSense router a few years ago, Iooked at using an old P4 system and wondered how a newer Atom compared. I did find a few benchmarks from Tom's Hardware or so that showed that a 2013 era Atom was generally in the same performance category as a Prescott P4 - some benchmarks the P4 would win (when the P4 had instructions that the older Atoms didn't support yet) and some the Atom would win.

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      • #4
        This is a good idea in general, but seeing -O2 instead of -O3 and no -march=native in most tests is a bit of a letdown. P4 are quite different from the generic target, and having gcc optimize for them could have swayed the numbers more than on modern cpus, more closely matching gcc's generic target.

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        • #5
          Very interesting, but a little bit difficult to interpret and grasp with so many different CPUs mixed together, with server, desktop and laptop CPUs all together.

          Would be really nice to see linear charts in the same family;
          7x0 -> 27x0 -> 37x0 -> 47x0 -> 57x0.
          Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, Broadwell.

          It would also be interesting to see a infographic with how a modern low-power laptop CPU compares against an old desktop CPU.
          Or how a new i3 Haswell compares against a old i7 Sandy Bridge.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
            IMHO you have to use the best CPU available in every class of CPUs. Example: pentium 4, best CPU monocore = pentium 4 670/672 and so on.
            I test with the hardware I available...
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              Those two oldies crying for Windows XP

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              • #8
                Imagine showing these charts to yourself from 10-15 years ago. It would be a priceless moment to see the face.

                Great work. I hope to see similar benchmarks when the 20th anniversary arrives. "Damn, those old i7 CPUs are so weak, they just can't keep up..."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  Very interesting, but a little bit difficult to interpret and grasp with so many different CPUs mixed together, with server, desktop and laptop CPUs all together.

                  Would be really nice to see linear charts in the same family;
                  7x0 -> 27x0 -> 37x0 -> 47x0 -> 57x0.
                  Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, Broadwell.

                  It would also be interesting to see a infographic with how a modern low-power laptop CPU compares against an old desktop CPU.
                  Or how a new i3 Haswell compares against a old i7 Sandy Bridge.
                  All the data is out there in a completely standardized format... You're free to modify pts_Graph or write your own parser to slice-and-dice the information however you want or format it however you want. Patches are welcome upstream.
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                  • #10
                    The Broadwell Core i3 5010 delivers over 4x greater performance-per-Watt than the old NetBurst CPUs while the Bay Trail Z3735F was almost 3x better.
                    Erm. I think it's more like 60x greater performance-per-Watt. I use a Pentium D system at work and it's just so slow. These benchmarks are just confirming what I knew.

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