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Intel Core i7 5960X CPU Core Scaling Under Linux

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  • Intel Core i7 5960X CPU Core Scaling Under Linux

    Phoronix: Intel Core i7 5960X CPU Core Scaling Under Linux

    With the Intel Core i7 5960X Haswell-E is an eight-core processor with Hyper Threading to yield sixteen logical threads, we're seeing how well this extreme Haswell processor really scales with modern open-source workloads as we benchmark the i7-5960X under Ubuntu Linux and see how the benchmarks scale with varying core counts.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20900

  • #2
    Is it possible to have the same test done on FreeBSD? I'm curious how it scales.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BSDude View Post
      Is it possible to have the same test done on FreeBSD? I'm curious how it scales.
      Haven't yet tried to see if/how the X99 + i7-5960X work with FreeBSD/PC-BSD. I have some old Linux/Solaris/BSD scaling tests for Sandy-E @ http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=16848
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        Interesting, especially the video encoding results.

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        • #5
          Awesome. Looks like compilation does take advantage of hyper-threading, I've always wondered this but couldn't find benchmarks when I looked.

          I'd be interested in seeing some workstation benchmarks of something like the Intel Xeon E3-1246 v3. The E3 v3s seem like the best way to get hyper-threading support for people who don't care about gaming and maybe want ECC. The E3-1246v3 comes with the Intel P4600 graphics, but I have no clue how the P4600 compares to the consumer 4600, especially on Linux.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 2bluesc View Post
            I'd be interested in seeing some workstation benchmarks of something like the Intel Xeon E3-1246 v3. The E3 v3s seem like the best way to get hyper-threading support for people who don't care about gaming and maybe want ECC. The E3-1246v3 comes with the Intel P4600 graphics, but I have no clue how the P4600 compares to the consumer 4600, especially on Linux.
            Unfortunately, Intel doesn't send out any server/workstation samples to Phoronix (though someone from the OTC is working to change that).
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              Michael, did you use the same Turbo Boost multiplier for the different number of cores? At stock, my i5 3570K will turbo to x38 on 1 core, but only x36 on 4. This could affect the scaling.

              Also, could you please run some of the benchmarks from a ram disk? Maybe some of the tests hit a bottleneck at the storage layer with so many threads, like VP8 encoding.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by vivo View Post
                Also, could you please run some of the benchmarks from a ram disk? Maybe some of the tests hit a bottleneck at the storage layer with so many threads, like VP8 encoding.
                VP8 encoding is rather slow (compared to x264) so I doubt it…

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vivo View Post
                  Michael, did you use the same Turbo Boost multiplier for the different number of cores? At stock, my i5 3570K will turbo to x38 on 1 core, but only x36 on 4. This could affect the scaling.
                  Great point, my i5-4670k works like that on turbo as well, by default. This is done for thermal reasons, to keep overall power under control. In that sense, it's not a bad idea to test the way Michael did, because it provides a real world estimate. Otoh, it would be nice to add tests at constant turbo freq, as you suggest, to see how the underlying electronics scale (neglecting power issues).

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