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Linux Benchmarks Of Intel's Quark X1000 On The Galileo Board

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  • Linux Benchmarks Of Intel's Quark X1000 On The Galileo Board

    Phoronix: Linux Benchmarks Of Intel's Quark X1000 On The Galileo Board

    For those curious about the performance of Intel's "Quark" x86 SoC for very low-power applications, including wearable devices, here's some benchmarks of Debian on their Galileo development board...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYyNTU

  • #2
    If I remember correctly, the Galileo is a hybrid Linux-Arduino board similar to the Arduino Y?N and Tre (though x86-based rather than ARM-based).

    When you do get one, it'd be interesting to see how the X1000 compares to the CPU portion of the BeagleBone Black, which has two non-AVR on-die microcontrollers (called Programmable Realtime Units).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
      If I remember correctly, the Galileo is a hybrid Linux-Arduino board similar to the Arduino Y?N and Tre (though x86-based rather than ARM-based).

      When you do get one, it'd be interesting to see how the X1000 compares to the CPU portion of the BeagleBone Black, which has two non-AVR on-die microcontrollers (called Programmable Realtime Units).
      Yes, the Galileo is a Linux based arduino, and it isn't really meant to run the same sort of tasks that you do with beaglebone. Off the top of my head, I'd say the only platforms you can compare it to (that PTS will actually run on) are the arduino tre, either of the beaglebones, raspberry pi, and probably some FPGA platform. Everything else isn't worth comparing. The Galileo is just a really powerful microcontroller.

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      • #4
        hlad to see some numbers for this chip

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
          If I remember correctly, the Galileo is a hybrid Linux-Arduino board similar to the Arduino Y?N and Tre (though x86-based rather than ARM-based).

          When you do get one, it'd be interesting to see how the X1000 compares to the CPU portion of the BeagleBone Black, which has two non-AVR on-die microcontrollers (called Programmable Realtime Units).
          Sadly it is not a hybrid; there is no microcontoller on the Galileo. The Arduino sketches are emulated in user-space software, using slow external pheriperals and thus unusable for anything real-time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jonnor View Post
            Sadly it is not a hybrid; there is no microcontoller on the Galileo. The Arduino sketches are emulated in user-space software, using slow external pheriperals and thus unusable for anything real-time.
            And when I say slow, I mean 250Hz I/O speed type slow.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jonnor View Post
              Sadly it is not a hybrid; there is no microcontoller on the Galileo. The Arduino sketches are emulated in user-space software, using slow external pheriperals and thus unusable for anything real-time.
              Ugh. In that case, I might as well just get an an Arduino Y?N or hang a cheap Chinese Arduino clone off one of the USB ports of a Raspberry Pi and write my own wire protocol.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
                Ugh. In that case, I might as well just get an an Arduino Y?N or hang a cheap Chinese Arduino clone off one of the USB ports of a Raspberry Pi and write my own wire protocol.
                Yep. The Arduino Tre will also be a sane solution, when it comes out.

                The Galileo development board also says explicitly that it cannot be powered via USB, as it draws too much power. I am really hoping that by the time the Edison is out, Intel will have gotten their act together.

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