Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pentium G620 vs Liano...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • s91066
    started a topic Pentium G620 vs Liano...

    Pentium G620 vs Liano...

    I need a really budget PC in order to replace my aged Athlon 64.
    I will run Linux and VM on that PC for common office work.
    My budget is no more than 200?, and I really need Virtualization extensions and 8GB RAM. So, I believe that I have some very limited options:
    G620, A4 or used C2Duo E6700 as well as used Phenom II...

    What is your opinion on that?
    And I don't care too much about power consumption, but I do care about noise...

  • curaga
    replied
    You always seem to be on the market, or maybe it's just my imagination

    In any case, Trinity is supposed to be Q2.

    Leave a comment:


  • Panix
    replied
    I'm comparing the Intel G540 and it looks only slightly slower than the G620 which looks like the next step up.

    For processing power, it beats the A6-3500 on practically anything so my question is how much power would a 'silent' video card add?

    Leave a comment:


  • Panix
    replied
    Originally posted by devius View Post
    Well, the Sandy Bridge Pentiums are in reality 35W TDP parts, although for marketing reasons (so they can sell more expensive "low-power" CPUs), they are branded as 65W. There are several sites out there that investigated the actual power consumption of these parts under full load and the results were between 31-37W. This means they don't get very hot and you can probably even underclock them, lowering power consumption even further and consequently noise as well.
    A better buy than Llano?

    Leave a comment:


  • aceman
    replied
    Originally posted by aceman View Post
    aceman

    Quote Originally Posted by s91066 View Post
    I am interested in a full load noise "test".
    Could you please tell me if my "ready made" you mean a known branded PC (HP, Dell etc?)
    Thanks

    Yes, it is a Lenovo IdeaCentre H420. I will try the full load test shortly.
    So, under full load (both cores, I did multithreaded WinRar, it gave 1.2MB/s in the benchmark), I could not hear any increase in noise.
    I a completely silent room, you can hear the fan a bit, but the HDD is louder when it reads/writes
    If you have any bit of background noise (TV, radio, people talking in next room, street behind window), you will probably hear nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • aceman
    replied
    Originally posted by s91066 View Post
    Well, according to Intel (http://ark.intel.com/products/53480), the G620 has VT-x...
    Yes, I was already corrected on that part, sorry.

    Originally posted by s91066 View Post
    I am interested in a full load noise "test".
    Could you please tell me if my "ready made" you mean a known branded PC (HP, Dell etc?)
    Thanks
    Yes, it is a Lenovo IdeaCentre H420. I will try the full load test shortly.

    Leave a comment:


  • devius
    replied
    Originally posted by s91066 View Post
    I am interested in a full load noise "test".
    Well, the Sandy Bridge Pentiums are in reality 35W TDP parts, although for marketing reasons (so they can sell more expensive "low-power" CPUs), they are branded as 65W. There are several sites out there that investigated the actual power consumption of these parts under full load and the results were between 31-37W. This means they don't get very hot and you can probably even underclock them, lowering power consumption even further and consequently noise as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • lem79
    replied
    Any of you with Athlon IIs, is there much lag in p-state switching? (i.e. takes a noticeable amount of time for the cores to change clock speed in response to a computational load)

    Intel CPUs since Core 2 Duo I believe have very minimal latency in changing p-states, as do AMD CPUs since the original Phenom. The old Athlons up to the 65nm X2s took about 200ms to clock up in response to a load, which was noticeable in general usage. That *may* explain the difference between an Athlon II X4 and a Sandy Bridge Pentium on the desktop..

    Leave a comment:


  • t.s.
    replied
    Well, don't go for branded PC. It's more expensive.

    Go for AMD X4 640 or G620. X4 if you want to maximize the core work (like VM, rip DVD, transcode, render, etc). Else, G620.

    Agree with Devius. the open source radeon still no match for intel open source driver, for now. If you've spare money and go X4 630 route, take an cheap nvidia VGA card and you'll good to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • s91066
    replied
    Originally posted by aceman View Post
    CON: only 2 cores, no HT, no virtualization (according to specs). Probably no overclocking.
    Well, according to Intel (http://ark.intel.com/products/53480), the G620 has VT-x...
    I am interested in a full load noise "test".
    Could you please tell me if my "ready made" you mean a known branded PC (HP, Dell etc?)

    @devplus: Thanks, your response is really helpful. If you imagine that on my PC the main problem is the desktop experience, (since the VM is a completely different thing), I think you helped me the most, as well as aceman.

    Thanks
    Last edited by s91066; 02-12-2012, 02:43 AM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X