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TrueCrypt 7.0 Released With Hardware-Accelerated AES

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  • phoronix
    started a topic TrueCrypt 7.0 Released With Hardware-Accelerated AES

    TrueCrypt 7.0 Released With Hardware-Accelerated AES

    Phoronix: TrueCrypt 7.0 Released With Hardware-Accelerated AES

    TrueCrypt, one of the popular open-source programs for on-the-fly encryption, is out now with version 7.0. Most notably, the TrueCrypt 7.0 release provides hardware-accelerated AES support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODQyNw

  • WorBlux
    replied
    *** THIS IS YOUR MOST EFFECTIVE PLAUSIBLE DENIABILITY:
    YES, you have encrypted data. It is {enter some description of reasonable personal information here
    }.

    Exactly, especially for courts, and especially if you hide really incriminating things encrypted and with stenography inside of a home movie or something like that.

    For the courts to order discovery the plaintiff needs to prove relevance. How do you prove the relevance of seemingly random data? (Even then, the I forgot of I don't recall line may be used) They would need more evidence than just finding a partition that is likely encrypted In criminal proceedings there are may not be any specific facts ordered to be revealed though discovery.

    It's just the rubber hoses that you have to worry about. For that you might mail a dvd seperate from your travels, hide an SD card in a hollow coin or shoe, and only working on data on know secure systems booted from ROM so no temp data is leftover.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimbo
    replied
    Once the attacker has sufficient information about your network he can begin to direct attack to enter a system to take control. If he access the computer that has mounted the encrypted disk TA DA!!! he doesn't even need to break the encryption because the disk is already mounted. There are a lot of literature about 802.11 risks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimbo
    replied
    There are many situations were you don't need to face experts security plp, you only require to hide your data, and hide you have hidden data. Even when you face experts the possibility to argue between a random formated partition and an encrypted one is an advantage.

    Erase software is aware of the situation you described, it writes every sector once than more time, you can set what pastern to write, you can set how many times... So you can force that 1 million of 0s are not written. You can force first all 0s , then all 1s then 01, what ever you want

    About recovering magnetic state before formating, ok the problem exist, solutions: 1) you can use a new disk , 2) you can use a previous encrypted data. Both solves the problems, but we are speaking about plausible deniability about current data on the disk, encrypted vs random formated. We don't care about previous data. This topic has more sense on other thread.

    About 802.11, you are so, so, wrong. Under strong security environment 802.11 is inviable, broadcast is inviable. All WIFI headers are low protected and they contain critical information about your network (macs, IPs, discovery protocols, etc), some control IP headers or 802.11 headers are low encrypted too and they contain critical information about your network. the IP data fields that contain data about the target encrypted partition are encrypted, but they are broadcast so brute force attacks could take place at peace, you let the attacker to sniff your packets day and night. You never will see a really critical security environment using wifi.

    Leave a comment:


  • droidhacker
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimbo View Post
    If you can only see mafia and court bad for u, plausible denial exist and is used, in many aspects. For example, there is a big difference if your boss suspect you steal information and then he goes to your desk:

    - 1, your boss finds stolen data. In your ?my documents folder?.
    - 2, your boss finds an encrypted archive.
    - 3, your boss finds an unformatted pen.

    And there are much more situations, simpler, complex, legal, illegal.. not only mafia and courts. I repeat plausible denial exist and it is used.
    Used... sure. Unsuccessfully. If your boss is such a dolt that he can't figure out that your "unformatted" disk is probably encrypted, then you could have hidden the data anywhere withOUT even being encrypted.

    If your boss suspects, he will take action. All three of your examples are executable ONLY by either the COURT or MAFIA, depending on which is selected by your boss. Your boss himself will end up in jail otherwise.

    Your idea of randomness is incorrect as the data increases the randomness is even more random, this is just why ?good? chaotic functions are used, there is no pattern to be found. Although in this context we are speaking about formating a partition with random data, even if a pattern is found the important is that the erased data can not be recovered.
    We're talking about the length of the data ***TO BE OBSCURED***, not the length of the randomness. The SOURCE of randomness is just a hose that dumps out an endless supply of random bytes.

    Example: If you write a string of a billion "0"'s to your disk, then the original information can be found by analysing the relative STRENGTH of the zeros. A "weak" zero was previously a "1", a "strong" zero was previously a "0".

    When dealing with TRUE randomness, any particular random BIT that comes out of the random number generator stands a precisely 50% chance of being a ZERO. The probability of getting TWO zeros in a row is 50% x 50% = 25%. The probability of getting THREE zeros in a row is 50% x 50% x 50% = 12.5%. The probability of getting a BILLION zeros in a row is (50%)^1000000000 = very small but ***NON-ZERO***.

    So now we start looking at an infinitely long string of data to obscure. You have an INFINITE number of sequential subsets of the data set of length 1 billion, which means that you have an INFINITE number of chances to achieve said pattern of a billion 0's back to back (by selecting an incremental offset from the starting position of 0-->infinity).... so tell me... what is (INFINITY x (50%)^1000000000)? The answer is, of course INFINITY, which means that you not only are guaranteed to have at least ONE sequence of 0's 1 billion bits long, you are actually guaranteed to have an INFINITE NUMBER of sequences of 0's 1 billion bits long. And laying down a line of 0's a billion bits long doesn't obscure ANYTHING because of the properties of the magnetic medium!

    Note: flash isn't susceptible to the same kind of attacks. I am not aware of any mechanism that can be used to extract "old data" from flash memory aside from data that was simply "erased" (since flash memory tends to be erased by 1'ing out just the first little bit rather than the whole thing).

    I have already pointed that the erase software takes care of writing every sector of the disk, more than 1 time (you can configure it), what kind of erase software should left untouched data on the disk?. You are not saying nothing new with this 0 first then 1.
    And writing every sector more than once doesn't actually guarantee that it *actually changes* anything to something meaningfully different. Nice that you write your random string of all-zeros down onto the disk 10 times... they're still all zeros and the magnetic medium STILL has variations in field strength that can suggest which bits were 1's and which bits were 0's.

    Now obviously, the data you are trying to obscure isn't infinite in length, so at least you aren't going to end up with an infinite amount of readable data.... but that is no guarantee. As unlikely as it is (and it is very very VERY unlikely), it is theoretically POSSIBLE for you to overwrite your entire disk with random data a million times and still have it boot up -- though this, again, would be with the infinite number of monkeys accidentally reproducing the contents of your disk on the last run rather than overwriting it a million times with 0's.... which could also happen. It won't boot up then, but it may still be possible to retrieve the data.

    WHICH IS WHY RANDOM DATA is not a valid choice when you are attempting to obscure data. ALL data destruction programs worth anything will repeatedly overwrite the disk using NON-RANDOM PATTERNS, i.e. 0x00, 0xFF, 0xCC, 0x33, 0xAA, 0x55. Look at those in binary -- you'll see that writing this kind of data does a lot of bit-flipping. THAT is what kills data.

    yeah wireless 802.11 is so untraceable and so secure. I can even imagine something more secure, good point!
    802.11 is simply the network. What you run OVER the network determines how secure your information is. I.e., does the vulnerability of 802.11 encryption make it dangerous to punch your credit card number into a secure website? The answer is NO because the traffic is encrypted between your browser and the server. Someone may listen in and capture the transaction, but the data is useless to them because it is encrypted. And with the option to change your mac address, the only thing that could really link you up would be signal triangulation -- but you'd see the black helicopters and black vans long before they got in close enough to pinpoint the endpoints of the signals to that kind of accuracy.

    In other words, NOTHING is 100%. Flash is probably better than magnetic, as long as you ACTUALLY overwrite the entire thing when you want it erased rather than just "erasing" it. Plausible deniability is ALMOST TOTALLY WORTHLESS. You DO have the right to have encrypted private data... at least you do in north america -- maybe not in some other places. ONLY the court (under certain circumstances) or mafia (if they feel like it) can take that right away from you, and plausible deniability doesn't work on them. Your boss can't tell you not to have private personal encrypted information. He may not like it, but if asked, the encrypted data is your credit card and bank account numbers, and he has no legal right to demand that you show it to him. If there is reason to suspect you of some kind of illegal activity, then it is up to the COURT to order the information out of you. If you pretend that you DON'T have encrypted data when you DO, then people will be SUSPICIOUS of you. In other words... why would you deny the existence of an encrypted file containing your credit card and bank account numbers? It doesn't make sense.

    *** THIS IS YOUR MOST EFFECTIVE PLAUSIBLE DENIABILITY:
    YES, you have encrypted data. It is {enter some description of reasonable personal information here}.

    Otherwise you end up with the problem of suspicion:
    Me: "I think you have encrypted data. It doesn't make sense that you have a disk with randomness on it -- you're using truecrypt."
    You: "No I don't."
    Me: "Yes you do, here's the truecrypt binary on your computer. What is the data."
    You: "There is none, quit looking at me like that."
    Me (loud): "HEY BOSS! This guy (you) is hiding encrypted data -- he may be stealing trade secrets."

    Alternative:
    Me: "That's an encrypted file."
    You: "I keep my credit card and bank account numbers in there so I don't forget them and so nobody can steal them if I accidentally drop the disk somewhere."
    Me: "Ok makes sense, carry on."

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimbo
    replied
    If you can only see mafia and court bad for u, plausible denial exist and is used, in many aspects. For example, there is a big difference if your boss suspect you steal information and then he goes to your desk:

    - 1, your boss finds stolen data. In your “my documents folder”.
    - 2, your boss finds an encrypted archive.
    - 3, your boss finds an unformatted pen.

    And there are much more situations, simpler, complex, legal, illegal.. not only mafia and courts. I repeat plausible denial exist and it is used.

    Your idea of randomness is incorrect as the data increases the randomness is even more random, this is just why “good” chaotic functions are used, there is no pattern to be found. Although in this context we are speaking about formating a partition with random data, even if a pattern is found the important is that the erased data can not be recovered.

    I have already pointed that the erase software takes care of writing every sector of the disk, more than 1 time (you can configure it), what kind of erase software should left untouched data on the disk?. You are not saying nothing new with this 0 first then 1.

    yeah wireless 802.11 is so untraceable and so secure. I can even imagine something more secure, good point!

    Leave a comment:


  • droidhacker
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimbo View Post
    You are always speaking about judges and court, what you have in mind? there are much more scenarios.
    Ok, sure. The MAFIA can come in and threaten to break your legs if you dont hand over the data... and since they aren't bound by the justice system, you're even LESS likely to win against THEM using plausible deniability.

    The ONLY cases where denying the existence of data matters are where those you are denying it TO have some means of forcing you to decrypt it for them.... and I can only think of the two cases where this is true; judicial orders or criminal coercion.

    Denying it to your GF/wife doesn't matter since she isn't even bound by logic. Denying it to a competitor doesn't matter since you can simply thumb your nose at them unless they are able to obtain assistance in the form of the previous paragraph.

    False, I already pointed why.
    You may have pointed out your opinion, or the law, but you know as well as OJ knows that the justice system is flawed -- you can never assume that the law will be executed perfectly.

    False, You are right about true randomness. Although the numbers created by some chaotic equations are very very near to truly randomness, in a large numbers of applications it doesn't care if the data comes from true randomness or very very near true randomness. And formating is one of them.
    Unfortunately, as I've pointed out, any kind of randomness, real or pseudo, GUARANTEES a chance of non-randomness, especially as the size of the data set increases. The chance of partial non-randomness actually approaches 100% as the data size approaches infinity. We're talking in calculus and chaos here. Basically, as the data set approaches an infinite size, application of a random transformation over the entire data set will yield an infinitely long set of non-random data (since a data set of infinite length has an infinite number of infinite-length subsets). I.e. an infinite number of monkeys on an infinite number of typewriters.... etc.

    Which, as you reiterate, is exactly why we need the following:
    Obviously the erasing software takes care of that. It really matters that "12345" is formated to "abcd5" (Hex values), preserving the 5.??
    Strictly BECAUSE it is guaranteed overwrite.
    I.e., if you write every bit on the disk with 0's and then every bit on the disk with 1's, then you have definitely changed every bit on the disk.

    And as I pointed out.... magnetic fields take time to align. When you just change the surface bit, the underlying layers SLOWLY absorb the changes over some period of time, and so you want to overwrite it with some non-incriminating and highly predictable pattern and let it sit for as long as possible in order for THAT PATTERN to sink in. After sitting for a long time, it is a good idea to do it again with a DIFFERENT pattern.

    If they are marked as a bad sectors is because they contain wrong data, or the data could not be accessed.
    It can mean lots of things, that the data wouldn't change when you wrote to it, that the checksum doesn't match the data, etc. The data that IS there is NEVER impossible to retrieve, though may require a specialized disk controller that is able to ignore the read errors and just spit out the data that's there.

    There are tools that try to format them anyway.
    The key being TRY. If the disk controller has them remapped, then you may need a specialized controller to REALLY try to force a rewrite.

    Plus, if this sectors contains fragments of encrypted / random data what is the problem? They will lead to nothing. Even if they could access to some bad sectors information, how many critical data could contain?
    This is the big question. HOW MUCH data is too much? I.e. sometimes all it takes is a little bit... and now with sector sizes up in the range of 4 kB.... you can store a lot of sensitive information in 4 kB. And if it can be determined or guessed that the data is encrypted, then all that's needed (even if it is just a fragment) is your decryption key or in the worst case a FEELING that you're trying to hide something.

    what solution you suggest if you want to preserve the data?
    NOW you've asked the RIGHT QUESTION.
    There is a limit to how far you can go to preserve data while keeping it a secret. Burying it 10 feet down in your neighbour's back yard (without his knowledge) and accessing it wirelessly/encrypted using a machine with read-only access to local disks is probably fairly safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
    The moral of the story: the only absolutely secure means of destroying data is to mix the disk into a vat of molten iron, and denying the existence of encrypted data is dangerous.
    More or less agree, but what solution you suggest if you want to preserve the data?.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimbo
    replied
    You are always speaking about judges and court, what you have in mind? there are much more scenarios.

    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
    In other words, it is now in **your** best interests to ensure that you don't have any genuinely random data on any disk in your possession, lest it be assumed to contain encrypted data
    False, I already pointed why.

    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
    FYI: randomness is not always a good approach to killing data (at least not by itself). In fact, it is a bad approach since (1) there is no such thing as truly random computer generated data, (2) randomness allows for the possibility that some segment of the disk will NOT be overwritten at
    ...
    False, You are right about true randomness. Although the numbers created by some chaotic equations are very very near to truly randomness, in a large numbers of applications it doesn't care if the data comes from true randomness or very very near true randomness. And formating is one of them.

    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
    randomness allows for the possibility that some segment of the disk will NOT be overwritten at
    ...
    Obviously the erasing software takes care of that. It really matters that "12345" is formated to "abcd5" (Hex values), preserving the 5.??

    Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
    that there is no such thing as a secure erase since the drive will remap bad sectors as they are discovered.
    If they are marked as a bad sectors is because they contain wrong data, or the data could not be accessed. There are tools that try to format them anyway. Plus, if this sectors contains fragments of encrypted / random data what is the problem? They will lead to nothing. Even if they could access to some bad sectors information, how many critical data could contain?

    Leave a comment:


  • droidhacker
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    On having courts force you - depends very much on local laws. In many places you cannot be forced to testify/incriminate against yourself, a relative, or a close person.



    - "recently used" shortcuts
    - a desktop tracker
    - temp files

    All good points, but also something anyone security-conscious will avoid. In other words, only handle secure content on known secure systems; in addition to those there could be keyloggers, screen cappers etc.
    These are, of course, the "low hanging fruits".

    One of the things that a lot of people don't think about (but is extremely obvious) is the contents of their SWAP FILE/PARTITION.

    Leave a comment:

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