Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Updated Intel Meteor Lake Tuning For Linux Shows Huge Performance/Power Improvements

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Updated Intel Meteor Lake Tuning For Linux Shows Huge Performance/Power Improvements

    Phoronix: Updated Intel Meteor Lake Tuning For Linux Shows Huge Performance/Power Improvements

    It's like magic with one line of code changed in the Linux kernel that Intel is reporting up to 19% performance improvement for Intel Core Ultra "Meteor Lake" and up to an 11% improvement in performance per Watt. Or in another EPP mode, the power consumption during video playback can be reduced by 52%!..

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Again another magical number ??
    But which is the best number then ? And how to know it ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Phoronos View Post
      But which is the best number then ?
      42

      Originally posted by Phoronos View Post
      And how to know it ?
      once you know what the question actually is, you'll know what the answer means

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by andyprough View Post
        42
        once you know what the question actually is, you'll know what the answer means
        ok but jokes apart ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Phoronos View Post
          Again another magical number ??
          But which is the best number then ? And how to know it ?
          Yeah, I was wondering the same thing. Since they use benchmarks to determine the "optimal" value (not sure if there is only one criterion here) and there are only 256 values to choose from, why not run something like the Phoronix Test Suite for each of the 255 values and determine the value that provides the optimal performance?

          Michael maybe you should add a lending hand here !

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Saverios View Post
            ...

            Michael maybe you should add a lending hand here !
            In exchange for a boatload of cash.

            Comment


            • #7
              I assume earlier generations will not see this boost? What is different in Meteor Lake that can benefit from such a small change?

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't like any of this crap.

                I remember PCs/laptops in the past worked at their maximum speed from the get go but you could alter their performance by using a different power plan.

                Looks like nowadays, the kernel must set the specific CPU registers for it to work properly. And of course, if you insist on something LTS'y or enterprise'y you're royally fucked because there's no way anyone will backport this.

                What's even worse is that on Windows you can trivially update a driver which does that and in Linux you need a whole new kernel just to make your CPU run at full speed.

                And of course Intel Thread Director has still not been fully ported to Linux. Amazing shit.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by avis View Post
                  I don't like any of this crap.

                  And of course Intel Thread Director has still not been fully ported to Linux. Amazing shit.
                  And when they turned off HT, I'm no longer needed? Anyway, it looks like P cores will say goodbye and be replaced by E cores in the future.
                  Then it won't be needed.‚Äč
                  From time to time, Intel invents a temporary bird to discard after a while.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Power and performance gains on this scale seem absolutely crazy! Especially given that Intel already optimized this and patched the kernel in February. Are there some obscure interactions with other modifications that happened in the kernel since, or does Intel just ballpark their performance tuning?

                    Now I'm really curious to see the evolution of performance, power consumption and power efficiency across all 256 EPP values. It would obviously take a while to obtain those numbers, but could this be automated with the Phoronix Test Suite?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X