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Shopping For A Launch-Day AMD Ryzen AI 300 Series Laptop For Linux Testing

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  • #21
    Cerebras WSE-3 (125 petaflops, 300000 TOPS):
    - 31.25x (125/4) than NVIDIA H100 GPU (4 petaflops, 30000 TOPS).
    - 2500x (125/0.05) than AMD Ryzen AI NPU's (0.05 petaflops, 50 TOPS).
    - 2604x (125/0.048) than Intel NPU 4 (0.048 petaflops, 48 TOPS).
    - 4166x (125/0.03) than Smartphone NPUs (0.03 petaflops, 30 TOPS).
    - 2500x (125/0.05) than AMD Radeon AI 300 Series (0.05 petaflops, 50 TOPS).
    - 1689.19x (125/0.074) than AMD Radeon RX 7000 Series (0.074 petaflops, 70000 TOPS).
    - 8503.4x (125/0.0147) than Intel Arc A750 (0.0147 petaflops, 2000 TOPS).
    - 762.939x (125/0.16384) than NVIDIA RTX 4090 (0.16384 petaflops, 100000 TOPS).

    My humble point of view: Until we reach at least WSE-3 performance at cheap consumer hardware, AI stuff will be a toy outside supercomputing and cloud. 10 years to reach it? 40 years? Stuff such as Copilot+ is like VR, still too experimental and more of a cool gimmick than real use. I hope NPUs will be useful outside AI/ML circus.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
      That ASUS Zenbook S is so much nicer than anything Framework, System76, and TUXEDO put out and at a much better price point.

      It makes sense, Asus is a big player and can afford to sell their products at a more competitive price point, those other three are probably barely treading water and don't have the same flexibility.
      That's really a matter of opinion. A "nice" machine where you are limited to 24 or 32GB soldered, and can't upgrade and repair it easily is what's been frustrating me for years. When the Framework 16 launched I joined the waiting list and have something far better than anything I've been able to get before.
      And as someone in the UK I can actually buy it. There have been ASUS, HP and Lenovo laptops that I see adverts for "coming soon" and never get sold in the UK.

      I really like that I have something that isn't everyone's take on a Macbook Air or Pro.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by nealeu View Post

        That's really a matter of opinion. A "nice" machine where you are limited to 24 or 32GB soldered, and can't upgrade and repair it easily is what's been frustrating me for years. When the Framework 16 launched I joined the waiting list and have something far better than anything I've been able to get before.
        And as someone in the UK I can actually buy it. There have been ASUS, HP and Lenovo laptops that I see adverts for "coming soon" and never get sold in the UK.

        I really like that I have something that isn't everyone's take on a Macbook Air or Pro.
        24/32GB soldered RAM is actually just fine for 99% of people out there. Thankfully, someone at ASUS or AMD has realized that 8/16GB laptops just don't cut it nowadays.

        Not only some modern games require ~12GB of RAM (I'm not counting VRAM), LLMs eat RAM for breakfast. Of course, it would be nice to see 64GB or ever 128GB SKUs as well for those who need to run VMs or even larger LLMs.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by avis View Post

          24/32GB soldered RAM is actually just fine for 99% of people out there. Thankfully, someone at ASUS or AMD has realized that 8/16GB laptops just don't cut it nowadays.

          Not only some modern games require ~12GB of RAM (I'm not counting VRAM), LLMs eat RAM for breakfast. Of course, it would be nice to see 64GB or ever 128GB SKUs as well for those who need to run VMs or even larger LLMs.
          24/32GB is fine for Windows end users. It may or may not be fine for professional users or Linux end users. Because I'm a Linux user that knows how systemd treats ram, 32GB is basically 16GB of ram after TMPFS needs are taken care of. An end user may or may not know to edit fstab to limit how much ram /tmp will gobble up. So with 24GB of ram and a game needing 12GB, thats nothing left for the actual system. It's all allocated to potential temp storage and a game

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          • #25
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

            24/32GB is fine for Windows end users. It may or may not be fine for professional users or Linux end users. Because I'm a Linux user that knows how systemd treats ram, 32GB is basically 16GB of ram after TMPFS needs are taken care of. An end user may or may not know to edit fstab to limit how much ram /tmp will gobble up. So with 24GB of ram and a game needing 12GB, thats nothing left for the actual system. It's all allocated to potential temp storage and a game
            tmpfs is 100% dynamic. If you've got no directories/files on it, it consumes around 0 bytes. It doesn't take 50% of RAM by default contrary to what you say/claim/imply. And if you really need to store huge temporary files, you may as well use your storage instead of RAM.

            On three of my Fedora installations all the tmpfs directories combined occupy less than 1MB.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by avis View Post

              tmpfs is 100% dynamic. If you've got no directories/files on it, it consumes around 0 bytes. It doesn't take 50% of RAM by default contrary to what you say/claim/imply. And if you really need to store huge temporary files, you may as well use your storage instead of RAM.

              On three of my Fedora installations all the tmpfs directories combined occupy less than 1MB.
              It used to not be that way...at least I can swear I remember TMPFS preallocating memory...perhaps I'm remembering back when we used to have to set all this up manually and I'm merging the memories together

              I'm using 35GB with just Firefox, Steam, Dolphin, and Yakuake running....because my dynamic RAM user, ZFS, is gobbling up 22GB. /tmp is using up a whopping 16K .

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              • #27
                Originally posted by oleid View Post

                By the way, are or will be all Snapdragon drivers mainline, especially GPU? Is this a criteria for you?
                Yes, and absolutely, I require full Linux support. Qualcomm is not there yet, but they are working on it. They announced that the major features required to use this chip effectively will be mainlined in kernel version 6.11. Based on the kernel schedule, that should be around 3 months from now. (and even longer for the optimizations to hit) I don't mind waiting a bit though. I can check out what Microsoft's been up to while I've been away. :P

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by krzyzowiec View Post

                  Yes, and absolutely, I require full Linux support. Qualcomm is not there yet, but they are working on it. They announced that the major features required to use this chip effectively will be mainlined in kernel version 6.11. Based on the kernel schedule, that should be around 3 months from now. (and even longer for the optimizations to hit) I don't mind waiting a bit though. I can check out what Microsoft's been up to while I've been away. :P
                  Yeah, I read about kernel 6.11. But I was especially wondering what GPU driver they will provide. Will it be https://docs.mesa3d.org/drivers/freedreno.html or maybe something proprietary? And will the NPU be supported? In any case, I'll keep an eye on it as well.

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