Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD EPYC 4124P Benchmarks: A Quad-Core $149 Server CPU

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AMD EPYC 4124P Benchmarks: A Quad-Core $149 Server CPU

    Phoronix: AMD EPYC 4124P Benchmarks: A Quad-Core $149 Server CPU

    Last week with the AMD EPYC 4004 review and benchmarks I tested nearly the entire product stack for these new AM5-based server processors with the EPYC 4244P (6 cores), EPYC 4344P (8 cores), EPYC 4364P (8 cores), EPYC 4464P (12 cores), EPYC 4484X (12 cores + 3D V-Cache), EPYC 4564P (16 cores), and EPYC 4584PX (16 cores + 3D V-Cache). The only EPYC 4004 class processor I wasn't able to finish testing in time was the entry-level EPYC 4124P as a 4-core processor with $149 retail price. I've now had the time to finish benchmarking that budget-focused Zen 4 server processor as well as seeing how it compares to the 4-core Skylake Xeons that were prolific for years.

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Does EPYC lineup offer any particular features that aren't available in Ryzen CPUs?

    Comment


    • #3
      Gosh if they could put this thing in a NUC or miniPC, that would be awesome for NAS stuff. Formal ECC support is too rare and usually too expensive normally.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mitch View Post
        Gosh if they could put this thing in a NUC or miniPC, that would be awesome for NAS stuff. Formal ECC support is too rare and usually too expensive normally.
        ECC is often supported on AM5 motherboards. My current home server runs an AMD Ryzen 9 7900 with 128GB of ECC memory. It's nice and powerful, but the limited number of PCIe lanes were a problem given that I wanted to run six NVME drives and a 10 gigabit Ethernet adapter as well.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Chugworth View Post
          ECC is often supported on AM5 motherboards. My current home server runs an AMD Ryzen 9 7900 with 128GB of ECC memory. It's nice and powerful, but the limited number of PCIe lanes were a problem given that I wanted to run six NVME drives and a 10 gigabit Ethernet adapter as well.
          Originally posted by Kjell View Post
          Does EPYC lineup offer any particular features that aren't available in Ryzen CPUs?
          ​Pretty much the selling point is I/O and core density. up to 128 PCIe lanes and many many cores per socket, and you can do multiple sockets with Epyc (like Xeon vs core). I think normal Ryzen maxes out at 24 lanes and 1 socket. Also registered DIMMs if thats important to you. A cheap one socket Epyc for a home NAS is pretty much overkill unless you need a ton of I/O and bandwidth for 10GBe or something like Chugworth here.

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess I have to be the cynic that says AMD is just trying to get rid of the EPYC processors that were the runt of the litter, so they disable most of the cores and sell than as entry level.

            Can't say I blame them, I sometimes look for reduced items at the supermarket that have an expiration date stamped that same day, as long as I intend to eat the item that day.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
              I guess I have to be the cynic that says AMD is just trying to get rid of the EPYC processors that were the runt of the litter, so they disable most of the cores and sell than as entry level.

              Can't say I blame them, I sometimes look for reduced items at the supermarket that have an expiration date stamped that same day, as long as I intend to eat the item that day.
              I can't say I care. They fill a nice slot with a really nice price tag given capabilities that aren't otherwise available.

              Comment


              • #8
                Wait, those are just regular AM5 Ryzens rebranded as EPYCs, aren't they?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
                  Wait, those are just regular AM5 Ryzens rebranded as EPYCs, aren't they?
                  From AMD slides there could me some tweak. That is why some benchmark with the ryzen counterparts would be useful

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
                    Wait, those are just regular AM5 Ryzens rebranded as EPYCs, aren't they?
                    They are AND are not the same, like Intel Desktop CPUs and Intel Xeon Server CPUs.

                    There are many internal "parts" that are the common between Ryzen & EPYC, but EPYC supports some features not found in Ryzen. Perhaps some doco on the AMD website goes into lots of detail, but here's the TL;DR version:

                    Epyc processors share the same microarchitecture as their regular desktop-grade counterparts, but have enterprise-grade features such as higher core counts, more PCI Express lanes, support for larger amounts of RAM, and larger cache memory. They also support multi-chip and dual-socket system configurations by using the Infinity Fabric interconnect.​
                    Quoted from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epyc
                    Last edited by NotMine999; 31 May 2024, 05:39 AM.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X