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Targeted Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler Optimization Rules Out 2k+ SPEC CPU Submissions

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  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by Developer12 View Post

    Do you know what 100% of the population uses? Integer performance. Your standard adds, subtracts, stores, shifts, loads, branches, jumps, calls, etc. Integer perf is what determines how fast the kernel runs, and it's what determines how fast every application runs.

    Most of your examples are someone using a spreadsheet. This isn't the 90's anymore, when 100 MHz was king. Even if you drop FP hardware entirely you can emulate it in software on a modern CPU using integer operations far faster than a human can perceive. The bottleneck for these jobs is how fast human meat fingers can enter numbers.​ They're not going to notice the difference if you trim a few hundred thousand transistors and have two FP units in each core instead of four.​

    And for those people *actually* relying on floating point performance? I don't know if you noticed but for the last 10 years they've been doing it on a GPU. 3D rendering? GPU. AI? GPUs. Weather modelling? GPUs. Exhaustive mathematical proofs? GPU. Nuclear weapons simulation? GPUs. Guess what: job submission to the GPU is 100% determined by integer performance.

    It's worth noting for historical context that in the era to which linus is referring (the late 90's) floating point was a big deal for one single reason: rendering 3D video games. 0% of games still do that on the CPU. No games are even still capable of it.
    You haven't ever taken a computer architecture class, have you?

    I take it Mr. "Developer12" (were "Developer1-11" already taken?) that you are unaware that modern x86 CPU's do not have floating point units.

    All of AMD's and Intel's current processors use the SIMD units for x87, aka floating point, math.

    You may also want to recalculate your "100% of the population uses integer" conclusion but in an ironic twist that only people with functioning brains could have seen coming, you need floating point math to do so.

    Thanks for playing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Developer12
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    I think it's a shame that a guy with a Master's degree in Computer Science, that leads development of a project with such a wide reach and makes millions a year, thinks that floating point is such a special use case that no one cares about.

    I guess mathematicians, scientists, analysts, economists and business people don't count.
    Do you know what 100% of the population uses? Integer performance. Your standard adds, subtracts, stores, shifts, loads, branches, jumps, calls, etc. Integer perf is what determines how fast the kernel runs, and it's what determines how fast every application runs.

    Most of your examples are someone using a spreadsheet. This isn't the 90's anymore, when 100 MHz was king. Even if you drop FP hardware entirely you can emulate it in software on a modern CPU using integer operations far faster than a human can perceive. The bottleneck for these jobs is how fast human meat fingers can enter numbers.​ They're not going to notice the difference if you trim a few hundred thousand transistors and have two FP units in each core instead of four.​

    And for those people *actually* relying on floating point performance? I don't know if you noticed but for the last 10 years they've been doing it on a GPU. 3D rendering? GPU. AI? GPUs. Weather modelling? GPUs. Exhaustive mathematical proofs? GPU. Nuclear weapons simulation? GPUs. Guess what: job submission to the GPU is 100% determined by integer performance.

    It's worth noting for historical context that in the era to which linus is referring (the late 90's) floating point was a big deal for one single reason: rendering 3D video games. 0% of games still do that on the CPU. No games are even still capable of it.
    Last edited by Developer12; 10 February 2024, 12:54 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    sophisticles our troll left the cave recently.

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
    I wish I could say I'm surprised, but I'm not.

    A significant portion of intel's efforts are in adding specific compiler optimizations and ISA extensions (eg. AVX 512) which support them, just to get better results in highly-specific benchmarks so they can claim "bigger number supremacy." Suffice to say, many people won't find such optimizations helpful in general use.

    See tovalds' thoughts on the matter: https://www.realworldtech.com/forum/...rpostid=193190
    I think it's a shame that a guy with a Master's degree in Computer Science, that leads development of a project with such a wide reach and makes millions a year, thinks that floating point is such a special use case that no one cares about.

    I guess mathematicians, scientists, analysts, economists and business people don't count.

    Leave a comment:


  • Developer12
    replied
    I wish I could say I'm surprised, but I'm not.

    A significant portion of intel's efforts are in adding specific compiler optimizations and ISA extensions (eg. AVX 512) which support them, just to get better results in highly-specific benchmarks so they can claim "bigger number supremacy." Suffice to say, many people won't find such optimizations helpful in general use.

    See tovalds' thoughts on the matter: https://www.realworldtech.com/forum/...rpostid=193190

    Leave a comment:


  • Targeted Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler Optimization Rules Out 2k+ SPEC CPU Submissions

    Phoronix: Targeted Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler Optimization Rules Out 2k+ SPEC CPU Submissions

    SPEC has effectively invalidated more than two thousand SPEC CPU 2017 benchmark submissions after it was discovered the Intel oneAPI DPC++ compiler was effectively "cheating" per their standards with a targeted optimization...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite
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