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AMD Ryzen 7 8700G Linux Performance

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Svyatko View Post

    To use ROCm you need to disable iGPU.
    I use dGPU for PCI-e passthrough.

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    • #32
      It's no monster, but it seems like an 8700G would be perfect for a decent all-around desktop that can hold its own with basic gaming.

      I'd love to see a comparison against similar-cost discrete CPU/GPU combos from Intel and AMD (though, in my case, there's a lot of value to the simplicity of an iGPU.

      Also, I wish AMD and Intel would just throw the full iGPU into all their APUs instead of having lower-end iGPUs for lower-end CPUs... I'd buy a Core i3 with a 96 EU iGPU or a Ryzen with 4 cores and 12CUs.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Modu View Post
        PCI-e limitation fot the GPU isn't a matter in fact as long as you don't saturate its vRAM which is my use case RX 6700XT drains much more power than RX7600 for the same performance and my present 450W PSU is also a limitation.
        There is the 6700 without XT and only 10 GB RAM, which is regularly available for below 300 € and has 175 W TDP (probably around 200 W for the whole card). That would have also easily fitted your PSU (GPU 250W, CPU 100W, Board 'n' Stuff 100W). Don't get fooled by the PSU recommendations from AMD/AIBs.

        I have the 5700G (same situation) and am searching for a new GPU, but my RX 480 is still doing it's thing so I'm not too much in a hurry.
        I also love the long term platform support from AMD, it's especially useful if your fine with older generation hardware or even used stuff.

        Originally posted by Svyatko View Post
        24 PCIe 3.0 lanes = 4 to chipset + 4 to NVMe drive + 16 to video card (1st PCIe slot).
        Yes I know, what's your point?​

        Originally posted by mangeek View Post
        Also, I wish AMD and Intel would just throw the full iGPU into all their APUs instead of having lower-end iGPUs for lower-end CPUs... I'd buy a Core i3 with a 96 EU iGPU or a Ryzen with 4 cores and 12CUs.
        Totally agree! But I think we might see this from Intel since they have already tiled up their chips. With monolithic chips its highly unlikely that only the CPU has defects but the GPU is fine.
        Last edited by Anux; 30 January 2024, 11:50 AM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by mangeek View Post
          It's no monster, but it seems like an 8700G would be perfect for a decent all-around desktop that can hold its own with basic gaming.

          I'd love to see a comparison against similar-cost discrete CPU/GPU combos from Intel and AMD (though, in my case, there's a lot of value to the simplicity of an iGPU.

          Also, I wish AMD and Intel would just throw the full iGPU into all their APUs instead of having lower-end iGPUs for lower-end CPUs... I'd buy a Core i3 with a 96 EU iGPU or a Ryzen with 4 cores and 12CUs.

          Hardware Unboxed recently did a review and included a RX 6500XT for laughs, even if in the end it wasn't much of a laugh for the 8700G.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by barti_ddu View Post

            AFAIU, this was fixed in I225 rev.2. I'm running STRIX B550-F for a several years and am very happy with it (upgraded from x370 Taichi, which was very flaky despite being of a higher class).
            That's good to know! The manual states it even supports ECC ram. Unfortunately, said manual also doesn't state which revision of the I225 is used, so for all I know it could vary which version was used in which batch of boards.

            Apparently the successor, the I226, went right back to having the same problem, just with lower energy consumption.

            The Intel Ethernet i226-V onboard 2.5 GbE controller appears to have a design flaw that causes the Ethernet connection to drop at random times for a few seconds. The I226-V is the latest version of Intel's cost-effective 2.5 Gbps Ethernet networking chips meant for PC motherboards with chipsets that...


            So that's CPUs, GPU drivers, *and* NICs I can't trust Intel to make right. And now it's rumored they want to completely overhaul their CPUs to drop HyperThreading (good) and use something called "Rentable Units", and swap computation components between Virtual CPUs behind the scenes in what sounds like a brand new security nightmare.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
              Unfortunately, said manual also doesn't state which revision of the I225 is used, so for all I know it could vary which version was used in which batch of boards.
              I've bought mine in 2020-08 (just checked that) and it was already v2:

              Code:
              # lspci -d 8086:15f3 -v
              06:00.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation Ethernet Controller I225-V (rev 02)
                  Subsystem: ASUSTeK Computer Inc. Ethernet Controller I225-V
                  Flags: bus master, fast devsel, latency 0, IRQ 36, IOMMU group 15
                  Memory at fc500000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=1M]
                  Memory at fc600000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=16K]
                  Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 3
                  Capabilities: [50] MSI: Enable- Count=1/1 Maskable+ 64bit+
                  Capabilities: [70] MSI-X: Enable+ Count=5 Masked-
                  Capabilities: [a0] Express Endpoint, MSI 00
                  Capabilities: [100] Advanced Error Reporting
                  Capabilities: [140] Device Serial Number d4-3f-64-ff-ff-d7-2d-e2
                  Capabilities: [1c0] Latency Tolerance Reporting
                  Capabilities: [1f0] Precision Time Measurement
                  Capabilities: [1e0] L1 PM Substates
                  Kernel driver in use: igc
                  Kernel modules: igc

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              • #37
                Originally posted by pWe00Iri3e7Z9lHOX2Qx View Post

                There have been rumors swirling for a while of a Strix Halo part with up to 16 Zen 5 cores and a 40 CU RDNA 3.5 GPU. Even if that ended up being 8 perf cores and 8 zen5c cores (or just 8 perf cores), that would be one hell of an APU.
                Those same rumors also mention a memory bus 256bits wide. So that points to an "Apple Silicon Killer" chip for laptops with soldered RAM, not a desktop chip unfortunately. Unless AMD brings the chip to AM5 boards with half the memory bus disabled.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
                  I'm surprised the 5600 series APUs are less power hungry, considering the 7000 series CPUs with no graphics are so much more efficient than the equivalent 5000 series, but considering how AMD's GPU department seems incapable of making a power-efficiency-leader GPU I guess that applies to their cut-down-for-APUs versions too.
                  It is more power hungry because they set the max clock speeds and power limits higher. At equivalent performance it would use less power. Or conversely, at the same power it would have much higher performance.

                  Anux said it looked like they were "overclocked 5000-series APUs", but it is not possible to overclock a 5700G that far.

                  Now if only the 5800X3D wasn't still over US$300. The entire build I'm looking at is nearly a thousand, which is way out of my price range, despite using mildly older parts.
                  The 5800X3D is overhyped and should not be considered unless you already have an AM4 motherboard.

                  Nearly everything has Realtek's mediocre hardware, and thus their bare-minimum drivers. I've been hating it ever since I discovered the power consumption of my Thinkpad A475's Realtek ethernet is more than any other component, and iirc as much as the rest of the machine combined.

                  Worst part of that is there are only a few B550/B650 boards which provide an alternative, that alternative is Intel 2.5G, and said Intel NIC has a major firmware bug that requires running Windows to fix so not an option.

                  Which means the best I can hope for is to disable the onboard NIC, hope that actually powers it off, and spend money and a valuable PCIe slot on a dedicated networking card without the problems. More $$$ down the toilet either way.
                  The amount of power used by the Realtek NIC won't even register, and as a matter of fact a PCIe card will almost certainly be worse.

                  Home-built desktop PCs do not, as a rule, idle below 20-30 W. You can only get there by starting with a PSU that is efficient at low load, avoiding AMD's multi-die processors, RGB lights, and mechanical hard drives, and connecting monitors to the motherboard and not the graphics card. And you probably have to avoid some memory overclocking settings. Typical is 50-60 W.

                  And that's not going to change unless the ATX12VO power supply standard catches on.


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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Svyatko View Post

                    ROCm has no support for APU, and never had.
                    ahem:
                    References to GFX1150 & GFX1151 targets have been spotted again—this time in a ROCm Github repository—by renowned hardware sleuth; Kepler_L2. These references were first spotted last summer, in an AMDGPU LLVM backend/compiler (reported by Phoronix)—industry experts immediately linked these target co...

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                    • #40
                      I am all hyped for the new iGPU, but remember what AMD did with the old iGPU, when they discontinued developement for the driver, while the product was still selling in retail / etail shops. And there was no new iGPU to upgrade the old one at the time. It was the best iGPU that AMD had to offer, and they discontinued development.

                      And AMD never implemented hardware accelerated GPU scheduling (WDDM) .... that was supposed to even help a bit with performance (more like to keep performance level stable and fair between multiple applications)

                      So I can only hope they will do better with 8700G

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