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AMD Launches The EPYC 8004 "Siena" 4th Gen EPYC Processors

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  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by panikal View Post
    That's pretty much the point of the discussion - see the above thread for how we got here. The 5% overhead I'm talking about is very rare times when I'm mobile with people like traveling or at a conference. Not a big deal and generally just gives me longer battery since I downclock normally on battery. I'm surrounded by...many many 70-90+ core machines with 1-2TB ram. I'm just wondering what someone would use that for in a mobile package where you didn't have access to that power via network ) mobile encryption hacking? espionage file scanning?
    But what I'm saying is, unless you don't have a network connection, what's preventing you from compiling remotely? But yeah, if there's no network and you have to get it done then it otherwise makes sense to want a beefy laptop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by panikal View Post

    Yes, I can use all the cores in my laptop when I'm compiling or running a test. Compiling is about the only thing that uses all of them at max. I went with the 7940hs because 5% of time matters when you're waiting.

    but you neither understood or answered my question - what, today, 2023, would you do with a 256 core laptop, other than "recompile Gentoo?" Anyway again it's about I/O and I really don't know what someone needs that much bandwidth in a portable device for and am truly really curious. I was looking to be educated not insulted by idiots.

    If you think your Iris Pro laptop was as fast as a Xeon workstation then I guess that sums it up.
    Well, I was processing scientific data on that quad core laptop for two years, while flying backwards and forward from opposite sides of the world, and got results which fed into larger datasets which I processed on stationary systems, so depending on what you do for a job, you can do much more than just compile Gentoo...

    I think you fundamentally failed to see the point I was making.

    Leave a comment:


  • panikal
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    If you're held back that much by compiling and you can't exclude certain files from being rebuilt, why don't you just have a separate small server just used to crunch numbers? Code is typically small enough that even if you're not home, it won't take that long to transfer.
    That's pretty much the point of the discussion - see the above thread for how we got here. The 5% overhead I'm talking about is very rare times when I'm mobile with people like traveling or at a conference. Not a big deal and generally just gives me longer battery since I downclock normally on battery. I'm surrounded by...many many 70-90+ core machines with 1-2TB ram. I'm just wondering what someone would use that for in a mobile package where you didn't have access to that power via network ) mobile encryption hacking? espionage file scanning?

    Leave a comment:


  • geerge
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    It's nice that AMD isn't showing signs of slowing down despite firmly being ahead of Intel in the server space. On the other hand, it's kinda like they're beating a dead horse except that horse has already decomposed. Not that I think AMD should slow down, but I'm worried if this means prices are going to skyrocket.
    A cost-cut version that still beats intel's best is amusing, and sets the stage to just compete on price when intel does something vaguely competitive whenever that happens. Sierra forest might be intel's start of competitiveness but it'll probably be the gen after that actually competes. So you'd hope AMD decides to gain market share by pushing the 8k series massively in the meantime.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by panikal View Post
    Yes, I can use all the cores in my laptop when I'm compiling or running a test. Compiling is about the only thing that uses all of them at max. I went with the 7940hs because 5% of time matters when you're waiting.
    If you're held back that much by compiling and you can't exclude certain files from being rebuilt, why don't you just have a separate small server just used to crunch numbers? Code is typically small enough that even if you're not home, it won't take that long to transfer.

    Leave a comment:


  • panikal
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    Back when Intel were stuck at 4 cores from Core 2 Quad all the way through to the i7 7700. I had an Iris Pro 4000 series laptop which got remarkably close to a desktop of the same generation... provided the desktop had the standard Intel cooler (with all the thermal throttling that entailed). It obviously lost badly to a well cooled 4790K or similar.

    I've still got said laptop in a cupboard, although it gets hammered by even a basic Ryzen 1700, never mind the newer ones.

    As for "what is done with that much power"? Work, relaxation. Does it matter? Questions like that should really be grouped into the "facepalm" category of innocent questions which age like milk - 640K should be enough for anyone? I'm sure the same question was asked when we hit 1GB of storage, or 1TB, or 1GB of RAM, or various GPUs; why would anyone need a 48GB GPU - well, I use 4 of 'em regularly...
    Yes, I can use all the cores in my laptop when I'm compiling or running a test. Compiling is about the only thing that uses all of them at max. I went with the 7940hs because 5% of time matters when you're waiting.

    but you neither understood or answered my question - what, today, 2023, would you do with a 256 core laptop, other than "recompile Gentoo?" Anyway again it's about I/O and I really don't know what someone needs that much bandwidth in a portable device for and am truly really curious. I was looking to be educated not insulted by idiots.

    If you think your Iris Pro laptop was as fast as a Xeon workstation then I guess that sums it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by panikal View Post

    The lowest TDP of these is already 70w...what would you need with that much I/O in a laptop? Really, seriously curious what people do on the run with that much power Anyway, when that day happens the server grade CPUs will be have 256 cores and tower will still be faster than laptop due to the additional space for both components and to manage thermals.

    Also there's never been a time that the fastest of fast high end laptops have matched an equivalently priced desktop, and I don't think the compaq portable counted as either a laptop or a workstation.
    Back when Intel were stuck at 4 cores from Core 2 Quad all the way through to the i7 7700. I had an Iris Pro 4000 series laptop which got remarkably close to a desktop of the same generation... provided the desktop had the standard Intel cooler (with all the thermal throttling that entailed). It obviously lost badly to a well cooled 4790K or similar.

    I've still got said laptop in a cupboard, although it gets hammered by even a basic Ryzen 1700, never mind the newer ones.

    As for "what is done with that much power"? Work, relaxation. Does it matter? Questions like that should really be grouped into the "facepalm" category of innocent questions which age like milk - 640K should be enough for anyone? I'm sure the same question was asked when we hit 1GB of storage, or 1TB, or 1GB of RAM, or various GPUs; why would anyone need a 48GB GPU - well, I use 4 of 'em regularly...

    Leave a comment:


  • user556
    replied
    Stacked V-cache has proven to be quite the power saver. So the per-core reduction in L3 cache possibly hurts Zen4C's efficiency. Maybe a stacked V-cache could be a future here too.
    Last edited by user556; 18 September 2023, 06:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • panikal
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    I can't wait till the day we get the 64 core one down to 70 watts so it can be used in a beefy laptop. Laptop workstations are lagging behind tower ones considerably nowadays!
    The lowest TDP of these is already 70w...what would you need with that much I/O in a laptop? Really, seriously curious what people do on the run with that much power Anyway, when that day happens the server grade CPUs will be have 256 cores and tower will still be faster than laptop due to the additional space for both components and to manage thermals.

    Also there's never been a time that the fastest of fast high end laptops have matched an equivalently priced desktop, and I don't think the compaq portable counted as either a laptop or a workstation.

    Leave a comment:


  • iustinp
    replied
    Interesting, curious what the idle total system power will be (for a basic system).

    Leave a comment:

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