Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD Ryzen 5 7600X Linux Performance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • AMD Ryzen 5 7600X Linux Performance

    Phoronix: AMD Ryzen 5 7600X Linux Performance

    At the end of September when the review embargo lifted I looked at the AMD Ryzen 9 7900X and 7950X for our launch-day Linux testing and that was then followed by the Ryzen 7 7700X Linux review. Since then I received the fourth and final Ryzen 7000 series desktop processor currently available: the AMD Ryzen 5 7600X. The Ryzen 5 7600X is currently AMD's most affordable Zen 4 processor at $299 USD and provides six cores / 12 threads and a boost clock up to 5.3GHz.

    https://www.phoronix.com/review/amd-ryzen5-7600x

  • #2
    This review has results that we should take a closer look at. On Windows systems we see that the AMD 7600X is on average as fast as the i9 12900k for gaming. With Linux we see that the 7600X is significantly faster on average than the 12900k for gaming.

    Why is this new AMD CPU generation on Linux so much faster than the best Intel CPUs for gaming? We don't see this on Windows systems so this is a unique fact.‚Äč

    Comment


    • #3
      Someone here said the scheduler for Intels big.little is not perfect under linux.

      Comment


      • #4
        After 2 agonizing years, I finally upgraded my system a couple months ago. Since I just do internet browsing and light gaming, judging by those results, I did right in not waiting for Zen 4. Got my R5 5600 for about 50% of the price of the R5 7600X (in my neck of the woods). Together with a cheap A520 mobo and memories, I got 80% of the gaming performance for half the price of the newer CPU combo. And my system runs cooler too, even with the box cooler.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Anux View Post
          Someone here said the scheduler for Intels big.little is not perfect under linux.
          it may be. As I can remember Michael published article about presentation from Linux Plumber conference and in it was mentioned that current scheduler implementation is not optimal for Intel's hybrid processors (with different cores).

          Comment


          • #6
            When I first saw the gaming benchmarks I thought "Holy Shit! From an APU with two cores?" and then I read the text about the GPU used

            My favorite part about these are that they all come with some graphics cores even if they aren't meant to be gaming grade. They still open up a lot of possibilities in regards to virtualization and accelerated containers and at least leave you with a working display in a worst case scenario, my GPU just died, situation.

            While they're nice, I'm still very happy with my 4650G Zen 2 system and don't feel much of a need to upgrade in regards to gaming. As is, my RX 580 is the weak link and needs to be upgraded before the motherboard, CPU, and ram...unless AMD releases a 7000 series or AM5 APU that's equivalent or better than a 580. I could make that work.

            Comment


            • #7
              The power consumption of the 5700g was pretty impressive, I wonder if the 7000 series APUs will be as efficient? Hopefully by the time the 7xxxg series come out, the b650 and even a620 motherboards and DDR5 will have come down a bit.
              Last edited by gukin; 07 October 2022, 11:10 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Almost unbelieveable what power at what low consumption AMD delivers by now. I was a first day buyer of a 3900X in 2019 including some AMD shares on the stock market and it's amazing to see where they are now.

                I have the feeling that nvidia is only going more and more power and consumption - wise on their chips, while Intel is still struggling with transistor size and their GPUs, while AMD goes for the pocket-sized laptop of the future, with low battery demand but high compute and gaming power. They are aspiring technological leadership, if not have it already and are only strugggling with the marketing giants that are still intel and nvidia.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My biggest frustration with AMD is on the used side. There's just so much recent gen Intel on the market so the prices tend to be much much lower. I was hoping that this would change. With that said, it's likely due to the longevity of the platform (talking AM4 or less). Intel, more, more options, much much lower prices. Again, maybe this will change in the future. I think we're already seeing this a bit with regards to AMD GPUs, but again, apple vs orange (red/green vs red/blue).

                  But, if you have to have "new" all the time, AMD does make for a very compelling platform vs. Intel (and vs Nvidia).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gukin View Post
                    The power consumption of the 5700g was pretty impressive, I wonder if the 7000 series APUs will be as efficient? Hopefully by the time the 7xxxg series come out, the b550 and even a520 motherboards and DDR5 will have come down a bit.
                    5700G are notebook chips that are to inefficient for mobile use and get repurposed for desktop.
                    There will definitely be APUs in the future but if they have enough bad SKUs to put out desktop parts remains to be seen. The last one was 6000 series and it never made it to desktops. A 7700G3D would be a no brainer. Phoenix Point is the code name if you want to go on a research.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X