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Intel Core i9 12900K vs. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X On Linux 6.0

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  • Intel Core i9 12900K vs. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X On Linux 6.0

    Phoronix: Intel Core i9 12900K vs. AMD Ryzen 9 5950X On Linux 6.0

    Ahead of Intel Raptor Lake and AMD Zen 4, it's a lot of fresh CPU re-testing at Phoronix under Linux with the bleeding-edge software stack of the latest Linux kernel as well as many new/updated benchmarks, the latest motherboard BIOSes, and more. As over the past year there has been a lot of work by Intel open-source engineers around better tuning the Linux kernel for their hybrid architecture, here are some fresh side-by-side benchmarks of the Intel Core i9 12900K against the AMD Ryzen 9 5950X.

    https://www.phoronix.com/review/linux60-5950x-12900k

  • #2
    Michael

    typo page 4:

    "to perform better whike​" should be "to perform better while​"

    grammar/typo page 7:

    "across this wide span of benchmarks and many covering many different workloads." should perhaps be "across this wide span of benchmarks and covering many different workloads." (no double many).



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    • #3
      Efficiency has a new meaning these days.
      Parts of Europe are easily hoovering around $0.5 per kWh on average.

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      • #4
        Thanks alot for running both CPUs with the performance governor, Michael!

        Also, this is interesting:

        When running these gaming tests, the Ryzen 9 5950X was on average consuming more power now than the Core i9 12900K but that Alder Lake CPU did still carry a higher peak power consumption.
        Really proves once more how efficient the performance governor really is, even on these high TDP processors (both AMD & Intel).

        But now I just can't help but wonder how efficient that governor can be on low-power SoCs like the Van Gogh APU inside the Steam Deck...

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        • #5
          So performance per watt is now very similar across both CPUs on the average, which is interesting. Still a bit worse on the Intel chip, but not by a huge amount.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JEBjames View Post
            Michael

            typo page 4:

            "to perform better whike​" should be "to perform better while​"

            grammar/typo page 7:

            "across this wide span of benchmarks and many covering many different workloads." should perhaps be "across this wide span of benchmarks and covering many different workloads." (no double many).


            Thanks,
            Michael Larabel
            https://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
              Efficiency has a new meaning these days.
              Parts of Europe are easily hoovering around $0.5 per kWh on average.
              I doubt that's gonna be a problem. People want max perf and are willing to overclock which can double the cost.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hamishmb View Post
                So performance per watt is now very similar across both CPUs on the average, which is interesting. Still a bit worse on the Intel chip, but not by a huge amount.
                It's depends. Eg. programmers may fully loaded CPU only for a few minutes per day, but may play games eg. 1h so Intel becomes more effective .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by HEL88 View Post

                  ...programmers may fully loaded CPU only for a few minutes per day, but may play games eg. 1h so Intel becomes more effective .
                  In that case maybe consider something like i5-12400 or ryzen 5600 instead?

                  More seriously, I'd love to see the power efficiency data for more mainstream cpu-s. The flagship models are not what most people will get.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HEL88 View Post

                    It's depends. Eg. programmers may fully loaded CPU only for a few minutes per day, but may play games eg. 1h so Intel becomes more effective .
                    Fair point. Do we know if Intel's idle or near-idle power usage is better though? It aught to be due to the E-cores, but would still be good to know.

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