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AMD Details New Model Numbering System For 2023 Mobile Processors

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  • AMD Details New Model Numbering System For 2023 Mobile Processors

    Phoronix: AMD Details New Model Numbering System For 2023 Mobile Processors

    Due to bringing a number of new SoC designs to market next year and trying to make their model numbers easier to decipher, AMD announced this morning a new naming system for Ryzen mobile processors...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/AMD-New-Model-SKUs-2023

  • #2
    Great, now I can focus only on "e" and "U" cpus and forget the rest of the numbers in the name
    And hope that some noname chinese vendor picks up these procs and offers nice small quiet passively cooled desktop systems with them. Intel is strongly dominating this segment ...

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    • #3
      Unless you're buying an Athlon there's a lot of overlap even on the Targaryen level? I feel like makers are going to use that to their advantage with Ryzen 5 and 7.

      Hey, Mendocino, aight!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pegasus View Post
        Great, now I can focus only on "e" and "U" cpus and forget the rest of the numbers in the name
        And hope that some noname chinese vendor picks up these procs and offers nice small quiet passively cooled desktop systems with them. Intel is strongly dominating this segment ...
        These tend to be outrageously priced industrial systems though. TBH I would rather underclock a desktop CPU or a gaming laptop for the same price.

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        • #5
          For me this new numbering looks completely f***ed. Why there is year code (to sell the same cpu architecture by incrementing number next year?) and why market segment number is more important than the architecture?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by V1tol View Post
            For me this new numbering looks completely f***ed. Why there is year code (to sell the same cpu architecture by incrementing number next year?) and why market segment number is more important than the architecture?
            The year code makes sense to me, sometimes they offer new products with old architecture for non nefarious reasons (like how the SoC in the Steam Deck uses Zen 2 but has RDNA iGPU). Sometimes you don't need the best latest processor just something good enough and cheap.

            But I do agree architecture and market segment should switch places.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pegasus View Post
              Great, now I can focus only on "e" and "U" cpus and forget the rest of the numbers in the name
              And hope that some noname chinese vendor picks up these procs and offers nice small quiet passively cooled desktop systems with them. Intel is strongly dominating this segment ...
              Likewise, AMD still has no solution to compete with intel's Xeon E-2300 for small servers. This was previously the Opteron 4000 series, with 35w-95w TDP range. EPYC 5000 series would be a perfect fit here, but they have yet to make any announcement. Not everyone who needs a server needs a 280w monster chip. There's a big market for small edge servers that AMD is ignoring right now.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                Likewise, AMD still has no solution to compete with intel's Xeon E-2300 for small servers. This was previously the Opteron 4000 series, with 35w-95w TDP range. EPYC 5000 series would be a perfect fit here, but they have yet to make any announcement. Not everyone who needs a server needs a 280w monster chip. There's a big market for small edge servers that AMD is ignoring right now.
                I have a running NAS on Athlon 200GE I would like to have the Pro edition (ECC). But its not available for Consumer. I would pick any <100€ <35W Zen based proc with ECC but its not existent for consumer. If the performance for 35W is great I would also pay 200€ ...but at the moment if you lucky you will find some around 150€ from china (Athlone 200GE). Which is too much. Besides they ar already used or they scam you - happend to me got a normal Athlon for a high price.

                I don't get why AMD? Do the low powered Pro thrieve that good in the oem market?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                  Likewise, AMD still has no solution to compete with intel's Xeon E-2300 for small servers. This was previously the Opteron 4000 series, with 35w-95w TDP range. EPYC 5000 series would be a perfect fit here, but they have yet to make any announcement. Not everyone who needs a server needs a 280w monster chip. There's a big market for small edge servers that AMD is ignoring right now.
                  There is a big market for such servers but as you alluded to, there's a hell of a lot of competition, and not just from Intel. AMD is raking in cash being basically the only sensible option for those 280W monster chips. From what I understand, they're still struggling to keep up with production in the markets they already target, so it makes sense they don't make a Epyc 5000 series, at least for now.

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                  • #10
                    AMD seems to be picking up the Intel market segmentation disease.

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