Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD Announces Ryzen 7000 Series "Zen 4" Desktop CPUs - Linux Benchmarks To Come

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Concerning that 230W socket power budget, it is probably future proofing to allow them to remain on AM5 for several generations. The upcoming Threadripper and EPYC processors should be on a new SP5 socket (LGA6096) if I am not mistaken (with the Threadripper being based on the EPYC version instead of on the Ryzen version).

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by qarium View Post

      and you want to upgrade to the 7700X ?

      can you tell me what you do with your cpu ?
      Maybe, depending on benchmarks and eventual sales, of course they could also release a more interesting one later to wait for.‚Äč
      As for what I do with it, a mixture of stuff, compiling, encoding, gaming (PC or emulators), etc. The more stuff it can do in parallel, the better.

      Originally posted by rabcor View Post

      It probably shouldn't. althuogh if their single thread performance advantage over intel's chips is the truth then these are some fairly compelling cores...

      too bad we're in the middle of a transition from x86_64 to RISC/ARM architectures; and my mid-range gaming laptop from 3 years ago is still completely solid for the latest games despite only having an 8th gen intel cpu in it and an rtx 2060.

      There's very little reason for anyone who bought a pc in the last 6 years to upgrade if they bought a halfway decent one (maybe if you do CAD work or a lot of compiling or other such intense work then you should be persuaded, but otherwise in general not), unless it broke; so I'm kinda inclined to wait for the RISC/ARM laptops to become properly mainstream. Apple set a precedent, I'm honestly quite surprised that this transition isn't already in full swing yet (suspicious even).
      Eh, more cores is always nice for stuff happening in the background such as compilation, encoding, etc.
      I think I didn't get any straight performance upgrade by moving to a Ryzen from my i7, but it did give me more cores (8 vs 2) and that was felt. (I hoped I'd get better thermal, but not at all! That was very disappointing, but I hadn't done my research on that.)
      So more cores + IPC improvements might convince me.

      Of course @Slithery‚Äč 's way might also work, but I don't think there's much improvements in the rest of AM4 to offset the annoyance of dealing with my heatsink.

      Though maybe I should upgrade my GPU first, it's not good enough to run all the stuff I want in real time and it's way older.

      Thank you!
      Last edited by geearf; 29 August 2022, 09:47 PM.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by rabcor View Post

        too bad we're in the middle of a transition from x86_64 to RISC/ARM architectures; and my mid-range gaming laptop from 3 years ago is still completely solid for the latest games despite only having an 8th gen intel cpu in it and an rtx 2060.

        There's very little reason for anyone who bought a pc in the last 6 years to upgrade if they bought a halfway decent one (maybe if you do CAD work or a lot of compiling or other such intense work then you should be persuaded, but otherwise in general not), unless it broke; so I'm kinda inclined to wait for the RISC/ARM laptops to become properly mainstream. Apple set a precedent, I'm honestly quite surprised that this transition isn't already in full swing yet (suspicious even).
        I'm not seeing this transition happening nearly as soon as you seem to think.

        Comment


        • #14
          This is all neat, cool, and exciting.... But I think I will sit this one out. Maybe by 2025, I'll have a reason to jump from my current AMD4 5xxx systems... or if I have a motherboard failure to force the issue (good excuse). Right now I have no idea what to even do with the powerful systems I have in place to fully utilize them. Compiles are quick, applications just pop up... etc. That's both on my 5900x R&D computer and the home 5600X general purpose computer. I don't do gaming at all... Run Linux on all systems. VMs are quick... So, from my point of view ... why upgrade? I mean upgrading is going to cost some bucks this time around! I've been spoiled to use the same mother boards, memory, drives from 1600X to the 5900X. Been a good ride. Going forward, the only thing I'd be reusing is the drives, power supplies and cases. That said, I'll enjoy the show watching others gloat ... err ... tell me about there new fancy systems and how much better they are than my ancient boat anchors Ha!

          wanting to upgrade my 2700X
          You still can just upgrade your system to a Ryzen 5XXX CPU. Prices have dropped. I could now buy the 5950X for the same price that I paid for the 5900X not that long ago....
          Last edited by rclark; 29 August 2022, 09:41 PM.

          Comment


          • #15
            Michael, you mentioned being on a plane in another thread, yesterday. Did you attend the launch event in person?

            Edit: yeah, I found where you mentioned that, at the end of the article. So, did you receive any further details that are still under embargo? Not that you could tell us the details themselves, but I wonder if the whole point of flying you in was just to see what's in the article.
            Last edited by coder; 29 August 2022, 09:54 PM.

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by phoronix
              AM5 can handle up to 230 Watt socket power delivery though the new Ryzen 9 7950X announced today has a 170 Watt TDP. (I am guessing that the ~230 Watt power delivery may come for future Threadripper branded parts making use of the same platform? And maybe then having Threadripper PRO be more differentiated at the top of the stack with separate socket, more memory channels, etc...)
              TDP is defined as an entirely made-up calculation by Intel and AMD (different calculations) which can be made anything they want it to be. It's only somewhat aligned with actual power use.

              This is shown by current products, the 5950X has a 105W TDP but actually consumes 142W, which is the max that AM4 allows for. Similarly, Intel's 12900K has a 125W TDP but actually consumes 241W (assuming that's how the motherboard configured it).

              Those are long-term sustainable power usage numbers, not just brief turbos.

              Zen 4 will no doubt be exactly the same. A "TDP" of 170, while actually using 230W. Proportionally, that's exactly in line with how their 105/142 Zen 3 TDP looked (74% TDP of actual watts used).
              Last edited by smitty3268; 29 August 2022, 09:53 PM.

              Comment


              • #17
                Coder, you must have missed the following:

                "After all, AMD wouldn't have sent me down here if not good Linux support and being concerned about the AMD Linux presence (I also wouldn't have bothered with the loss of productivity/downtime to travel if not sure of Zen 4 being primed for Linux). As I've been covering over the past great number of months, AMD has been quietly getting their Zen 4 support into place with the Linux kernel"

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by coder View Post
                  Michael, you mentioned being on a plane in another thread, yesterday. Did you attend the launch event in person?
                  Yes, as mentioned in the article.
                  Michael Larabel
                  https://www.michaellarabel.com/

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by rclark View Post
                    Coder, you must have missed the following:
                    Yes, like an excited child on Christmas morning, I just looked at the slides. I did search the article for phrases like "attend" and "in person", but Michael somehow managed to avoid using either.

                    Anyway, I already edited my post with a follow-up question about the event.

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Michael View Post
                      Yes, as mentioned in the article.
                      Yeah, I just saw that part.

                      So, was there any more to the event, or was it just that presentation + some sort of reception?

                      And regarding the lack of Zenver4 compiler support, how are you expected to test AVX-512 performance? Do they typically provide any guidance on which compiler flags to use?

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X