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AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 5965WX Performance On Linux

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  • Akiko
    replied
    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
    Those are interesting insights. Performance is great, power draw under load acceptable, though idle power draw is indeed annoyingly high.
    I also did not realize that a 5995WX literally costs 7600€, the way I remember Threadripper prices, they used to be a bit lower.
    It is a Threadripper PRO 5975WX, though combined with the board still quite expensive. The high power usage comes from the mainboard. There are 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, two actively cooled components on the board and it has 1x 24pin power, 2x 8-pin cpu power, 1x 8-pin pcie power and 2x 6-pin pcie power connectors.

    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
    ... and without the pci=noaer boot parameter, the system partition keeps filling up with gigabytes of PCIe error messages in the kernel log. Though you would think a 1000€ mainboard like the ASUS WRX80 wouldn't have all those problems the standard ones have.
    Amen brother ... seriously, had the same issue with the ASRock Taichi X399, but isn't a surprise at all, ASRock is a sub company of ASUS. And to close the circle, I also have an ASUS KGPE-D16, using two Magny Cours in the early days and now 2x Opteron 6380. This board does not have the ASPM/AER issues (AER is just advanced error reporting, what you see is fucked up power management in the PCIe subsystem), but it has other really annoying issues. This is the last time I bought an ASUS product, though, the sound card is definitely nice.

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  • david-nk
    replied
    Originally posted by Akiko View Post
    old system: 128-134 watts (pure idle), ~330 watts (full cpu load), ~520 watts (cpu + gfx load)
    new system: 214-224 watts (pure idle), ~475 watts (full cpu load), ~670 watts (cpu + gfx load)
    Those are interesting insights. Performance is great, power draw under load acceptable, though idle power draw is indeed annoyingly high.
    I also did not realize that a 5995WX literally costs 7600€, the way I remember Threadripper prices, they used to be a bit lower.

    The mainboard problems seem to be similar to what I experienced. Compute only works in one of the PCIe slots for an undocumented arcane reason that I already forgot, and without the pci=noaer boot parameter, the system partition keeps filling up with gigabytes of PCIe error messages in the kernel log. Though you would think a 1000€ mainboard like the ASUS WRX80 wouldn't have all those problems the standard ones have.

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  • Akiko
    replied
    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
    Now that even the 7900X and 7950X is expected to have a 170W TDP, buying a Threadripper is an actual consideration for a developer machine
    As a developer machine? Uhm, no, this is a bit much/overpowered. No worries, I will explain. First, I have a Threadripper PRO 5975 since ~10 days (could have bought 2 used cars - seriously, currently this tech is to expensive), though I use it to put out Yocto builds. So for distribution building this one may be a better match compared to an Epyc (base and turbo clocks are just to low).

    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
    You get a lot more power for a moderate increase in power draw.
    Okay, my setup is the following:
    - ASUS WRX80 Sage (this one is a joke, will explain)
    - Threadripper PRO 5975WX (is actually unlocked)
    - Noctua NH-U14S (fans replaced by 2x Noctua NF-A15)
    - 8x 32GB DDR4-3200 ECC CL22 (Mushkin MPL4E320NF32G28 - can deal with ~3400 MHz without voltage increase)
    - Radeon RX6800 (TDP set to 227 watts)
    - ASUS Xonar Essence XTS II 7.1 (power connector is nuts, but the sound is actually pretty good)
    - 4x 2TB Samsung PM9A1 NVMe (in ASUS Hyper M2 gen4 - as RAID1+0 and LUKS2 AES256-XTS full crypto)
    - 3x 2TB Patriot Viper VPN100 (also in ASUS Hyper M2 gen4 - actually bricked the fourth one - as RAID5 and LUKS2 AES256-XTS full crypto)
    - 3x 2TB Toshiba HDWD120 (RAID5 and LUKS2 AES256-XTS full crypto)
    - 1x LG GH20NS15
    - 1x Fujitsu MCR3230AP-S (yeah, GigaMO drives are nice)

    That setup runs Arch Linux and AwesomeWM. Before that I had exactly the same setup with a Threadripper 1950X and an ASRock Taichi X399 mainboard and an additional Radeon RX460 for PCI-passthrough + looking-glass (which I can not use anymore).

    old system: 128-134 watts (pure idle), ~330 watts (full cpu load), ~520 watts (cpu + gfx load)
    new system: 214-224 watts (pure idle), ~475 watts (full cpu load), ~670 watts (cpu + gfx load)

    pro:
    - encryption performance basically doubled, the new AES-NI 256bit opcodes push LUKS performance to about 5100 MiB/s
    - cpu stay impressively cool, hard to push it beyond 55°C
    - all core turbo stays at 4 GHz (base is 3.6 GHz)
    - Yocto build times are basically 1/3
    - used full PCie lanes setup everywhere (7x 16-lane PCIe 4.0 is really nice)
    - Threadripper is unlocked, you can pick CPU and RAM frequencies
    - floating point/AVX performance is really really nice (though, you need to go for clang 14, does much better vectorization compared to gcc 12)
    - mainboard comes with one ASUS Hyper M2 card, which actually is nice (the cooling of NVMe's is such much better)

    cons:
    - mainboard is a joke
    ASPM-support is not only broken, its a cluster-fuck. The whole PCIe subsystem is spilled by transaction errors (which get corrected - no problem - but eats power and performance). In comparison to the WRX80 Gigabyte/Supermicro boards the ASUS uses the AST2500 (from the stone age) as the base for their BMC. The mainboard is damn picky, it took me about 20 hours to get it stable, figure out the right PCIe slot usage order (no shit, that drove me insane) and proper UEFI/BMC setup. Using several gfx cards results in switching primary gfx card issues at every reboot. Set primary gfx output to discrete gfx card in UEFI (instead of BMC VGA) does not work at all. You have to turn of VGA using the switch on the mainboard.
    - the advertised ~200 GiB/s memory performance at 8x DDR4-3200 is something you never going to see in even specialized use cases, you can be happy if you see 70 GiB/s (they don't tell you, that this speed is achieved if you use 4+ cores)
    - idle power usage is to high for my taste
    - what is that thing about having Wifi on workstation mainboards, while have 2x 10 GBit LAN, I really don't get it
    - fucking RGB connectors ... on a workstation mainboard
    Last edited by Akiko; 09 August 2022, 04:02 AM.

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  • Volta
    replied
    vegabook


    The problem with apple is their mediocre OS. They can have the best hardware (I doubt), but mac os brings everything down.

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  • kylew77
    replied
    Excited for whatever forthcoming BSD benchmarks Michael has planned for this beast of a processor. Thankful for Michael covering the assorted *BSD OSes.

    Leave a comment:


  • domih
    replied
    TR 3960X user here, very comfortable with several IDEs, DBs, VMs all running at the same time with Graphics card, NVMe card, SAS RAID card and 40+ Gbps NIC.

    Threadripper non-PRO is dead. AMD, when it was hungry, welcomed my enthusiast $$$.

    Not anymore. Pricing of Threadripper PRO is beyond my individual developer budget.

    At least, I can thank AMD for a period of generosity with the Threadripper non-PRO. Amen.

    Leave a comment:


  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by david-nk View Post
    Now that even the 7900X and 7950X is expected to have a 170W TDP, buying a Threadripper is an actual consideration for a developer machine.
    You get a lot more power for a moderate increase in power draw.
    I was gonna say, with those Zen4 SKUs so close to launch, these Threadrippers may have a rather short life as a DIY part. And yes, I'm fully aware there are differences, but Ryzen is still considerably cheaper.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Rose
    replied
    Couple of model number typos: 565WX, 59965WX, 596WX.

    I wish I had some justification to buy such a machine.

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  • anarki2
    replied
    We'll have to revisit these benchmarks in 3 months or so because clearly, there's just way too much untapped potential. Some serious optimization (scaling) yet to be done.

    Leave a comment:


  • david-nk
    replied
    Now that even the 7900X and 7950X is expected to have a 170W TDP, buying a Threadripper is an actual consideration for a developer machine.
    You get a lot more power for a moderate increase in power draw.

    Leave a comment:

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