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AMD Developing "PMF" Linux Driver For Better Desktop/Laptop User Experience

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  • AMD Developing "PMF" Linux Driver For Better Desktop/Laptop User Experience

    Phoronix: AMD Developing "PMF" Linux Driver For Better Desktop/Laptop User Experience

    AMD recently started posting Linux patches for a Platform Management Framework "PMF" driver that is designed to "enhance end user experience by making AMD PCs smarter, quieter, power efficient by adapting to user behavior and environment."..

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/AMD-PMF-Linux-Driver

  • #2
    Sounds exciting, pity it is Linux specific from looking at the code so other operating systems can't benefit from it. It is also gpl v2. Would be nice to see nice Zen3+/Zen4/Zen5 support on FreeBSD and OpenBSD.

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    • #3
      This gives me hope that in 15 years we might finally have GUIs for open source graphics drivers.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cl333r View Post
        This gives me hope that in 15 years we might finally have GUIs for open source graphics drivers.
        For AMD GPUs CoreCtrl and radeon-profile are pretty good - tried them myself and can recommend. Though I am using only amdfand from amdgpud project right now.

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        • #5
          Was thinking I read a deja-vu article, but the other one was "How To Use The New AMD P-State Driver With Linux 5.17", seems related as both drivers are for managing performance states? I think the best approach is to have a standard interface (at /sys) for the different platforms, I remember when there were AMD cool&quiet and Intel P-states individual drivers but now ACPI cpufreq manages both platforms nicely, hopefully this effort and Intel Thermald/DPTF will coalesce into a singular interface. So, I'm a bit worried there is the other article's AMD P-State and now also PMF just for AMD.

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          • #6
            Let's hope this finally gives us access to the 30+ missing sensors in AMD devices...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
              Let's hope this finally gives us access to the 30+ missing sensors in AMD devices...
              While the obsessive must-know-everything part of me agrees, at the same time I mostly just want to track whether or not I (initially) have a good heatsink mount, and for that chiplet temps will suffice. Other than overclocking, is there a particular reason for needing to monitor dozens of readings rather than just one-per-chiplet?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
                While the obsessive must-know-everything part of me agrees, at the same time I mostly just want to track whether or not I (initially) have a good heatsink mount, and for that chiplet temps will suffice. Other than overclocking, is there a particular reason for needing to monitor dozens of readings rather than just one-per-chiplet?
                Having the option doesn't hurt. If it can be done on Windows (HWiNFO64), why not on Linux?

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