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Benchmarking The Linux Mitigated Performance For Retbleed: It's Painful

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  • Benchmarking The Linux Mitigated Performance For Retbleed: It's Painful

    Phoronix: Benchmarking The Linux Mitigated Performance For Retbleed: It's Painful

    Yesterday Retbleed was made public as a new speculative execution attack exploiting return instructions. While the "good" news is Retbleed only impacts prior generations of AMD and Intel processors, the bad news is the mitigated performance impact on Linux is quite severe. Since yesterday I have been benchmarking the newly-merged Linux patches on various Intel and AMD processors affected by Retbleed. It's very bad if you are on an affected processor.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=31291

  • #2
    I'm very glad to be running Zen 3 right now

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    • #3
      Very happy to be on Zen 3...but even if you're not, very happy that AMD actually carried AM4 from Z1 to Z3, because upgrading should be doable for all their clients. For Intel...

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      • #4
        I'm going to continue saving to exit this hellscape known as x86.

        Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post
        I'm very glad to be running Zen 3 right now
        Considering that Ryzen chips use the AMD PSP which is like having a closed source backdoor doing God knows what I don't know how happy I would be.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PublicNuisance View Post
          I'm going to continue saving to exit this hellscape known as x86.
          Flaws of a similar nature have been discovered in the Apple M1 as well.

          We do need to get past x86 however this is not architecture exclusive phenomena.

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          • #6
            I'm sticking with mitigations=off as always

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            • #7
              The "do basic desktop stuff" impacts weren't too horrendous. For any benchmarks that also run on Windows, it would be interesting to see the comparison between Windows 10 and Linux with mitigations in place. Does Windows even have a way to turn them off (globally or granular per mitigation)?

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              • #8
                maybe this is the first time that im going to skip the mitigations ...at least on my gaming rig.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ezst036 View Post

                  Flaws of a similar nature have been discovered in the Apple M1 as well.

                  We do need to get past x86 however this is not architecture exclusive phenomena.
                  I wonder for how long can we continue to add more and more subsystems to CPUs until no one is able to understand how they interact with each other anymore. These countless vulnerabilities make me wish that CPU makers would simplify instead of complexify, but I guess there's no money nor performance to be made there.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kvuj View Post

                    I wonder for how long can we continue to add more and more subsystems to CPUs until no one is able to understand how they interact with each other anymore. These countless vulnerabilities make me wish that CPU makers would simplify instead of complexify, but I guess there's no money nor performance to be made there.
                    "no perfomance made there" in the first place which results in no money I guess.

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