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QEMU 7.0 Released With Intel AMX Support, Many RISC-V Additions

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  • QEMU 7.0 Released With Intel AMX Support, Many RISC-V Additions

    Phoronix: QEMU 7.0 Released With Intel AMX Support, Many RISC-V Additions

    QEMU 7.0 is out today as the newest version of this important piece of the open-source Linux virtualization stack...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...U-7.0-Released

  • #2
    I'm happy to see 9pfs on mac hosts in there: https://gitlab.com/qemu-project/qemu...6b6998b91b816e

    I'm hoping that this is going to make mounting shared directories between host and guest easier on the M1 at work for dev environments.

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    • #3
      QEMU is the best and actually runs well on Windows if you're willing to make some tweaks. It's not very user friendly though, not at all.

      For many many years I have seen a lot people who struggle with QEMU command arguments. Most try a user-friendly interface like VirtManager, then they try to find out what commands are being generated. Some scratch in the logs of "/var/log/libvirt/qemu/", others try "ps aux | grep KVM" and even if users know about "virsh domxml-to-native" they struggle a lot. I sympathize with them. I've been there. It's not fun at all.

      I understand why most people use VirtualBox and it's really annoying because it's just "nasty" piece of software. I would like to see better interoperability with libvirt or alternative user-friendly interfaces in future releases (without the need to run a #!%!ing webserver and web interface!).

      PS: Lots of things being released today.

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      • #4
        still no vulkan support sadly, but the new dbus interface is really nice, hope it leads to some better VDI setups.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jabberwocky View Post
          For many many years I have seen a lot people who struggle with QEMU command arguments. Most try a user-friendly interface like VirtManager, then they try to find out what commands are being generated. Some scratch in the logs of "/var/log/libvirt/qemu/", others try "ps aux | grep KVM" and even if users know about "virsh domxml-to-native" they struggle a lot. I sympathize with them. I've been there. It's not fun at all.
          Hey, I tried to use virtmanager several times and allways had some options that didn't work with it or I couldn't even get the whole mess to run at all. At the end I allways rolled back to a shell script with a super long quemu-line in it, atleast thats controlable and gives working results. Not easy, pretty ugly but enough for my windows gaming needs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Anux View Post
            Hey, I tried to use virtmanager several times and allways had some options that didn't work with it or I couldn't even get the whole mess to run at all. At the end I allways rolled back to a shell script with a super long quemu-line in it, atleast thats controlable and gives working results. Not easy, pretty ugly but enough for my windows gaming needs.
            one of the issues with qemu is there are so many bloody options, making a UI for it is quite the chore. also libvirt isn't a qemu control but a generic vm control platform. though virtmanager is more oriented to KVM (using qemu), it also supports LXC and XEN VMs.

            if you wanted a good UI you would need a dedicated qemu UI. but like I said, that can be quite the chore. I once thought about tackling it, but that would have to be a paid job lol. making a simple GUI for options would be fairly easy, making it look okay and be usable however. well avoiding choice vomit might be a hassle

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            • #7
              Can't say I'm a fan of all the deprecation.
              Half the point of QEMU is to run things without physical hardware.
              To be able to emulate a older ARM is useful if you're writing esoteric stuff.

              Not everything is a modern desktop or a server system.
              If the m68k can live in the form of virtualization, so should the older ARMs and PPCs.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
                Can't say I'm a fan of all the deprecation.
                Half the point of QEMU is to run things without physical hardware.
                To be able to emulate a older ARM is useful if you're writing esoteric stuff.

                Not everything is a modern desktop or a server system.
                If the m68k can live in the form of virtualization, so should the older ARMs and PPCs.
                what was depreciated that would effect this?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
                  if you wanted a good UI you would need a dedicated qemu UI.
                  My setup is extra special (AMD decided to change something in their windows driver 4 years ago and since then I need to manually design the PCIe layout) I have no hopes of ever getting a GUI that supports this kind of fuckery. Took me a day testing, searching the net and reading man pages. ^_^ It's my hobby and I learned alot.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                    what was depreciated that would effect this?
                    - QEMU 7.0 drops support for old PowerPC 401 / 403 / 601 / 602 CPUs.

                    - Dropping of Armv4 and Armv5 from the Tiny Code Generator (TCG).

                    Or what did you mean?

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