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How To Use The New AMD P-State Driver With Linux 5.17

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  • How To Use The New AMD P-State Driver With Linux 5.17

    Phoronix: How To Use The New AMD P-State Driver With Linux 5.17

    Since the release of the Linux 5.17 kernel the leading question in my inbox has been from readers asking how to actually make use of the AMD P-State driver. Right now this driver isn't the default over ACPI CPUFreq and I haven't seen any Linux distribution vendors announce their plans to immediately default to this new driver, but over the months ahead I expect that to change. In any case, if wanting to use amd_pstate on Linux 5.17 today here is a brief how-to guide for making the transition...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...P-State-How-To

  • #2
    Thanks for the how-to!

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    • #3
      What is the advantage to do so? I have a Ryzen 7 5800X, so it would be supported.
      How to change that on Manjaro?

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the detailed explanation.
        Currently on a 84 days uptime on the eligible machine, but whenever it´ll finally break, I´ll use these instructions for my Zen 2 APU.

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        • #5
          Tested with fedora 36 and AMD Ryzen 9 3900X, needed steps:
          Code:
          sudo grubby --args=initcall_blacklist=acpi_cpufreq_init --update-kernel=ALL
          sudo grubby --args=amd_pstate.shared_mem=1 --update-kernel=ALL
          
          ➜ cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_driver
          amd-pstate

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          • #6
            Originally posted by obri View Post
            What is the advantage to do so? I have a Ryzen 7 5800X, so it would be supported.
            How to change that on Manjaro?
            The advantage would be more performance for less energy -> more efficiency. I doubt you will get much more performance on a desktop, but rather better temps/less power draw.
            For Manjaro i'd say it should be pretty much the same as described but you'd have to add the module to your mkinitcpio.conf instead of "/etc/initramfs-tools/modules " - don't quote me on that though ^^

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            • #7
              obri You'll see better energy efficiency and higher effective clockspeeds. Works like a charm on my 3900X and increased my clockspeeds in slightly threaded workloads and games by 50Mhz-100Mhz on every core.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by obri View Post
                What is the advantage to do so? I have a Ryzen 7 5800X, so it would be supported.
                How to change that on Manjaro?
                As said above, the benefit is more for laptops, but it might help your desktop save power without hurting performance. Also, some mobos will not have the necessary CPPC support enabled.

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                • #9
                  Well, given that e.g. on an 5950x amd p-state and schedutil result in an over 6% performance regression, e.g. for compiling software (like the Linux kernel ;-) I can't really recommend it right now; which is also why the amd-pstate driver is disabled on shared memory solution CPUs by default, ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOF8OAVTw9Y
                  Last edited by rene; 22 March 2022, 02:15 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I don't know if it's amd-pstate driver, or something else, but idle power consumption of my thinkpad with 5850u and UHD display dropped from 3.1W to 2.65W. Real power consumption when i am working with 5% brightness is cca 3-3.5W.

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