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AMD Announces Ryzen 7 5800X3D Shipping On 4/20, New Mainstream CPUs

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  • Michael
    replied
    I got one on NewEgg this morning, coming tomorrow for Linux testing.

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  • xorbe
    replied
    5800X3D was in stock for an hour at both Newegg and AMD directly for MSRP. Still available at Amazon as of 10:40AM Pacific for MSRP. Only two scalpers on eBay.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post
    Unfortunately AMD hasn't provided any review sample.... So unless I see a 5800X3D in stock at retail price tomorrow, no.
    It would be interesting, but I suspect the types of tasks that benefit would likely be the same ones that respond well to Milan-X.

    From what I've seen on other sites, it's comparatively good at gaming, but not moreso than Alder Lake. Most other desktop apps seem hurt more by the lack of turbo than they benefit from the additional L3 cache.

    The one bright spot is that it seems to be more power-efficient than the baseline 5800X, although it's hard to say whether that's due more to clockspeed restrictions or the additional L3 cache.

    For my money, I think the 5700X is a lot more interesting. It's basically a discounted 5800X that's restricted to 65 W.

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by DanglingPointer View Post
    Michael are we getting a review of this chip?
    Unfortunately AMD hasn't provided any review sample.... So unless I see a 5800X3D in stock at retail price tomorrow, no.

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  • DanglingPointer
    replied
    Michael are we getting a review of this chip?

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  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by Duve View Post
    You would be wrong, on top of gaming applications... be V-cache also seems to be focused on cloud deployments. The Milan-X is an Epyc chip after all and released first.
    I obviously know about Milan-X. Their Ryzen consumer CPU is targeting gamers, because most consumer desktop apps won't be affected that much, and the ones that need that will be encouraged to go to the Threadripper line (or Eypc, obviously) where they can charge more for it.
    Last edited by smitty3268; 20 March 2022, 03:19 AM.

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  • Duve
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

    since gaming is what they're really targeting with these chips (non-gaming purposes are still likely going to be dominated by Alder Lake)
    You would be wrong, on top of gaming applications... be V-cache also seems to be focused on cloud deployments. The Milan-X is an Epyc chip after all and released first.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
    But for me, AL desktop, as it is right now, well, it's just not a clean and elegant solution.
    Yup, it lacks simplicity and symmetry. Worse, there are obvious pitfalls.

    Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
    The fact that you like have a full AVX512 support in P core (which by the way costs not a trivial amount to transistors to have), which is artificially disabled is somewhat workaroundish solution.
    True. I'm sure there were heated battles fought at Intel over this decision. After years of singing the virtues of AVX-512 and optimizing lots of software for it, the last thing some of them wanted to do was surely to step back from it.

    Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
    I hope Intel will implement full features ISA for E's in the future, so no such workaroundish solutions will be necessary and we'll have truly big.Little like ARM does.
    ADL is like what ARM does. It's just that they had to cut down the Big core to get there, instead of building up the small core (which they did somewhat, with the addition of AVX2).

    I expect future generations of E-cores will have AVX-512. Maybe not in Raptor Lake, which I think is made on the same manufacturing node and possibly even uses the same E-cores, but probably Meteor Lake (which is slated to use the "Intel 4" manufacturing process).

    Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
    it would not supersize me if ZEN4 will be a little slower than Raptor Lake's P core. Anyway, we'll see.
    As long as AMD lacks a proper E-core, they'll have to make more compromises in their micro-architecture than Intel does. I think Zen 4 will offer better perf/W, but maybe not the absolute best performance against Raptor Cove.

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  • drakonas777
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    You guys seem to regard these E-cores as garbage, but they're really not bad. Intel claims they have similar per-clock performance as Skylake cores.
    E cores are certainly not a garbage. Personally I think they are pretty cool, and assuming the rumors regarding 8E cores-only mobile Pentium series are true - they potentially may be amazing price/performance for budget notebooks, miniPCS, SBC's and whatnot. Also Intel most likely will develop them further, so instead that weak old facion atom-like architecture line we will get more like a small and quite full feature "core series" version of the core. That's nice.

    My main criticism is for the AL desktop SKUs specifically, and partially it's not even that technical, but matter of use case and personal taste. It's obvious that hybrid architecture has some advantages. Nobody is denying that. But for me, AL desktop, as it is right now, well, it's just not a clean and elegant solution. I get the reasoning why it's made the way it is, but still. The fact that you like have a full AVX512 support in P core (which by the way costs not a trivial amount to transistors to have), which is artificially disabled is somewhat workaroundish solution. Yeah I get that you do not need those often but it's just not elegant. I hope Intel will implement full features ISA for E's in the future, so no such workaroundish solutions will be necessary and we'll have truly big.Little like ARM does.

    BTW, AFAIK AMD will use hybrid architecture for future APU line only, ZEN5 + ZEN 4. At least all rumors I saw were related to APUs. Yea, it's kind of hilarious that ZEN4 will be "the small one", so it's says something about the size of ZEN5 I guess . Anyway currently AMD's philosophy (as per some interview, now forgot exactly which) is to use like "medium" size, but similar cores. So it would not supersize me if ZEN4 will be a little slower than Raptor Lake's P core. Anyway, we'll see.

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  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by billyswong View Post
    And then there is also the bottleneck caused by managing too many parallel threads. Sometimes threads / tasks need to be synchronized or resources need to be locked / unlocked.
    That depends on what you're doing. There are lots of parallelizable tasks that aren't bound by lock-contention. However, memory bottlenecks can definitely start to limit scaling.

    Originally posted by billyswong View Post
    Therefore, the maximum number of cores that can utilized efficiently are also limited by the speed of P-cores / main memory / IO latency. When that core count is reached, E-cores lost their appeal again in deskstop / workstation / server use.

    Hybrid CPUs are welcomed in mobile in part for their idle power saving. Those "8Ps + 4Es" Intel CPUs are probably for the same purpose, pointless for desktop but useful for laptop.
    Using the heuristic that their E-cores are roughly half as fast as their P-cores, it comes down to a question of whether you'd rather have an 8-core CPU or a 10-core CPU. Most people wouldn't regard that distinction as meaningless.


    Source: https://www.anandtech.com/show/17047...d-complexity/7

    In actual fact, single-thread performance of their E-cores is 64.5% or 54.1% of a P-core, for SPECint2017 or SPECfp2017, respectively. So, a 8+4 core combo is more like 10.6 or 10.2 P-cores, for int or fp-dominant workloads.

    You guys seem to regard these E-cores as garbage, but they're really not bad. Intel claims they have similar per-clock performance as Skylake cores.

    Leave a comment:

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