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Intel i9-12900K Alder Lake Linux Performance In Different P/E Core Configurations

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  • Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    Intel has been pushing the idea that the scheduler will solve this issues without requiring the processor affinity which is what I am calling snake oil.
    I'm not sure where you see Intel pushing this.

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    • Originally posted by Michael View Post
      Haven't been able to reproduce, but now that you indicate an OpenBenchmarking connectivity problem.... If you try now does it work? Just flushed some firewall blocks in case something like that happened...
      Articles are now loading OK. Thanks.

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      • Fantastic benchmarks; thanks for doing this.

        Outside of 'benchmarks', I can totally see myself being happy with a 1P/4E/96EU casual computing machine where the kernel only throws consistently demanding threads onto the P core.

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        • Originally posted by Michael View Post

          None of the tests in this article were AVX-512. See the linked article from there if wanting AVX-512 ADL data. Was simply mentioning when all E cores are disabled, AVX-512 is possible. AVX-512 was out of scope for this article especially with many workloads not being relevant for AVX-512, this article was just about core/thread comparison.
          thanks

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          • Originally posted by birdie View Post

            Ah, so there are "right" and "wrong" Linux distros and only you know which one to choose.
            You can choose one of the hundreds of Linux distributions (which nobody ever heard about), but it won't make any sense. Don't cry when someone chooses broken copy of Windows from torrent for a benchmark, ok?
            Last edited by Volta; 21 December 2021, 06:09 PM.

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            • Originally posted by birdie View Post
              In Linux on the other hand we have the kernel all by itself, the Xorg/WM or Wayland Compositor by themselves and running applications. All of them are not aware of one another altogether.
              This could be easily done by distributions, but I'm not sure about their reasons to not to do so. Look below:

              This is further exacerbated by the fact that in Linux you can increase [decrease] your process priority ("niceness"), say 19, but you can never lower it back to the original value, e.g. 0. This sounds almost idiotic to think about that. Why can't you renice it back to 0? In the end you can simply restart it and circumvent this "restriction".
              Maybe in your 'nobody ever heard of' distribution. In Fedora you can do this from system monitor, but to set higher priority you have to provide password. This is because of 'obvious' security reasons.
              Last edited by Volta; 22 December 2021, 06:09 AM. Reason: user password not root

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              • Originally posted by Volta View Post

                This could be easily done by distributions, but I'm not sure about their reasons to not to do so. Look below:



                Maybe in your 'nobody ever heard of' distribution. In Fedora you can do this from system monitor, but to set higher priority you have to provide root password. This is because of 'obvious' security reasons.
                This is doable in Gnome System Monitor (Gnome 41.2 -- Arch) : user can set affinity, lower or increase priority per process; the bird-man as usual lives under a rock and/or has no clue.
                Last edited by Grinness; 22 December 2021, 04:57 AM. Reason: Typo: Gnome System Settings -> Gnome System Monitor

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                • Originally posted by birdie View Post

                  This is further exacerbated by the fact that in Linux you can increase your process priority ("niceness"), say 19, but you can never lower it back to the original value, e.g. 0. This sounds almost idiotic to think about that. Why can't you renice it back to 0? In the end you can simply restart it and circumvent this "restriction".
                  You can decrease the priority of a running linux process to be newer, its just if go down below 0 you need sudo permissions (I think this is due to the fact that the range below 0 is typically for kernel level processes that have higher priority than userspace).

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                  • Originally posted by Anux View Post
                    Not true, i have already debunked this.
                    You debunked that the 12900K is terribly inefficient, power hungry, and more expensive than it's worth compared to the much better 12700K? Where?

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                    • Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
                      Birdie is definitely not a Intel/NVIDIA fanboy, he just possess a normal need to defend a certain company and a certain product during 9 page comments thread. Just that - normal need to defend company/product, NOT a fanboy :lol: Anyway.
                      Ehh. I honestly don't think birdie is a fanboy of anything he's just a troll who enjoys causing drama.

                      He carefully targets whatever topics he thinks are popular on the forums and takes the opposing viewpoint, no matter what it is. People like AMD? Birdie will chime in on every topic about how great Intel and Nvidia are compared to them. People like linux? Birdie will tell you how great windows is. People like [insert topic here]? Birdie will type in 100 posts on the topic about how great whatever their competitor is. If the forums ever flip and the majority start talking about how great Intel and NVidia are, I fully expect birdie will start posting about how AMD is actually the best.

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