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The End-Of-Year 2021 State Of Linux On Apple's M1 SoC

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  • #11
    Originally posted by discordian View Post
    Anyone got an idea if and how Windows 32/64 bit games would run there, either on Qemu/Wine or some virtualization on MacOS?
    Considering getting something-M2 in 1-2 years.
    You would need QEMU / Wine Hangover https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...0.6.5-Released but long story short the performance would probably be shit and subpar to an x86_64 laptop.
    Michael Larabel
    https://www.michaellarabel.com/

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Aryma View Post
      waste of time
      Somewhere between 5 and 10 years, parts with M1 chips will be less than $100. Being able to use one as a cheap Linux machine will be useful.

      I have Linux on 8 year old and 12 year old laptops right now.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Michael View Post

        You would need QEMU / Wine Hangover https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...0.6.5-Released but long story short the performance would probably be shit and subpar to an x86_64 laptop.
        Wouldn't Box86 and Box64 clear the way for better x86 performance? I thought their performance costs were pretty minor 9% to 12% IIRC. They even got Crysis to run on a dingy old ARM processor (low FPS, but still). It may just invalidate the need for QEMU but for commercial / server usage.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Mitch View Post

          Wouldn't Box86 and Box64 clear the way for better x86 performance? I thought their performance costs were pretty minor 9% to 12% IIRC. They even got Crysis to run on a dingy old ARM processor (low FPS, but still). It may just invalidate the need for QEMU but for commercial / server usage.
          The other thing to consider is that the M1 has an edge in that it supports the same memory ordering semantics as x86. This isn't an accident, as it's used by rosetta to avoid wasteful memory barriers.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Mitch View Post

            Wouldn't Box86 and Box64 clear the way for better x86 performance? I thought their performance costs were pretty minor 9% to 12% IIRC. They even got Crysis to run on a dingy old ARM processor (low FPS, but still). It may just invalidate the need for QEMU but for commercial / server usage.
            That's kinda what I want to hear, i also red about using parallels desktop to run Windows 10 Arm (still not officially released) then use windows x86 emulation. Wasn't tested with games tho.

            Some dual boot MacOS with wine running on Rosetta2 would likely be the best option.
            don't want an extra box just for a couple old games.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by discordian View Post
              That's kinda what I want to hear, i also red about using parallels desktop to run Windows 10 Arm (still not officially released) then use windows x86 emulation. Wasn't tested with games tho.

              Some dual boot MacOS with wine running on Rosetta2 would likely be the best option.
              don't want an extra box just for a couple old games.
              I'd use crossover instead of Parallels. My 7-core gpu macbook air can run Skyrim on really high settings via crossover. It's basically like wine. No virtualization.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Mitch View Post

                I'd use crossover instead of Parallels. My 7-core gpu macbook air can run Skyrim on really high settings via crossover. It's basically like wine. No virtualization.
                Is your MacBook using an ARM CPU? I don't think crossover will work.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by discordian View Post
                  Is your MacBook using an ARM CPU? I don't think crossover will work.
                  The M1 CPU so yes. Mine is the lowest-end M1 chip in all of Apple's lineups since it's 7-core GPU, 8-core CPU (but it has 16 GB RAM). Crossover works super well so far with Steam and Steam games. It's about the same experience you'd expect using Steam Proton on an x86 Linux install. For example, Skyrim still needs that weird launch option to fix the audio situation just like Proton.

                  I'm as surprised as you are that it works so well.

                  For anyone who's unsure, here's a demo someone made of Parallels vs Crossover on an M1 Chip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oet8GoDopVc
                  Last edited by Mitch; 16 December 2021, 06:06 PM.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Mitch View Post

                    The M1 CPU so yes. Mine is the lowest-end M1 chip in all of Apple's lineups since it's 7-core GPU, 8-core CPU (but it has 16 GB RAM). Crossover works super well so far with Steam and Steam games. It's about the same experience you'd expect using Steam Proton on an x86 Linux install. For example, Skyrim still needs that weird launch option to fix the audio situation just like Proton.

                    I'm as surprised as you are that it works so well.

                    For anyone who's unsure, here's a demo someone made of Parallels vs Crossover on an M1 Chip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oet8GoDopVc
                    Yeah, you said "It's basically like wine. No virtualization.", while it has to be emulation of the whole userspace. Great news none the less

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                    • #20
                      Don't look now guys but: Apple helping Asahi Linux to port Linux to M1 cpu (links to Twitter, if you don't want to click, see below)

                      ‚Äč

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