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Linux Driver For Arm China's Zhouyi AI Accelerator Proposed, But Lacks Open User-Space

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  • Linux Driver For Arm China's Zhouyi AI Accelerator Proposed, But Lacks Open User-Space

    Phoronix: Linux Driver For Arm China's Zhouyi AI Accelerator Proposed, But Lacks Open User-Space

    The Zhouyi AI accelerator was developed by Arm China and is found in some SoCs so far. An open-source Linux kernel driver is being worked on for it but unfortunately for now at least any mainline ambitions are immediately stalled over the lack of an open-source user-space/client...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...iver-Zhouyi-AI

  • #2
    Let's see how many reply does it take for people to start flaming chinese

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    • #3

      Let's see how accurate the owl is.

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      • #4
        I'll bite! Any hardware or software from China raises red flags for me. If it's open-source and audited, I have no further objections, but for goodness sakes look at the track record of their government and the close connection between Chinese big business and Chinese government. Spy chips on Supermicro boards, spyware on Lenovo computers, state-funded hacking and cyber-terrorism, and cellphones that censor anti-government sentinents. Trusting Chinese hardware and software as the default position seems the stance that needs justification.

        I don't defend the privacy-related practices of American government or American big business (Microsoft, Google, Facebook, etc.). Both are execrable. But the Chinese government's practices are in another league.

        EDIT: I have exactly the same red-flag concerns whenever I see that Google, Amazon, or Facebook are contributing to Linux. If it's open-source and audited, fine. But my first thought is always: Are they helping us or screwing us?
        Last edited by Eumaios; 24 November 2021, 10:45 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          Let's see how accurate the owl is.
          3, exactly.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Eumaios View Post
            I'll bite! Any hardware or software from China raises red flags for me. If it's open-source and audited, I have no further objections, but for goodness sakes look at the track record of their government and the close connection between Chinese big business and Chinese government. Spy chips on Supermicro boards, spyware on Lenovo computers, state-funded hacking and cyber-terrorism, and cellphones that censor anti-government sentinents. Trusting Chinese hardware and software as the default position seems the stance that needs justification.

            I don't defend the privacy-related practices of American government or American big business (Microsoft, Google, Facebook, etc.). Both are execrable. But the Chinese government's practices are in another league.
            "Muh spy chips", as if the US government doesn't just order companies to give them all the information they want, https://www.businessinsider.com/coin...-taxes-2017-11 . You're a fool who believes that one countries spying practices are worse then others, fix the issues in your own nation before looking to solve issues in others.

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            • #7
              Thank you for name calling; that always raises the level of any discussion.

              I may well be foolish. I'm glad you're happy to live under Chinese communism, but I would not be.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Eumaios View Post
                Thank you for name calling; that always raises the level of any discussion.

                I may well be foolish. I'm glad you're happy to live under Chinese communism, but I would not be.
                "While Oceania has some issues, thankfully I don't live under evil Eurasia rule"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doomsdayrs View Post

                  "Muh spy chips", as if the US government doesn't just order companies to give them all the information they want, https://www.businessinsider.com/coin...-taxes-2017-11 . You're a fool who believes that one countries spying practices are worse then others, fix the issues in your own nation before looking to solve issues in others.
                  He's a fool who knows nothing of the outside world.

                  Spy chips on Supermicro boards. Pul-leeze, the story was so utterly ridiculous from the get-go that even the US's own Department of Homeland Security basically called it a crapshoot.

                  As for Superfish, Lenovo is not the only OEM to have preloaded it, and Superfish had already been causing problems since 2010 in the form of drive-by downloads. He's just shitting on Lenovo because they are the only high-profile OEM to have gotten flak for it. Bet he doesn't know that Superfish is not even written by Chinese developers or the Chinese government.

                  Talking about state-funded hacking and cyberterrorism is a complete joke when the US has been caught with its pants down in slipping actual spyware into appliances and their respective firmwares. Bet he has not ever heard of 'Pegasus'.

                  And I bet he doesn't know that most of Asia adopt very different values and censorship is seen is a distasteful but necessary evil. But then again, who am I to make comparisons with a 'free' country like the US which boasts about free speech and freedom of expression, and yet immediately launch brutal cancel campaigns against anybody and even whole countries who dares question the 'US good, China bad' narrative?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                    ... but unfortunately for now at least any mainline ambitions are immediately stalled over the lack of an open-source user-space/client...
                    "Unfortunately"?

                    What is good for the goose is good for the gander. If the "new standard" is, apparently, no driver in the kernel until an open source user space client exists (for at least validation if not full utilization), that is the way it will need to be going forward (for this, or other, kernel drivers).

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