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AMD Announces Milan-X 3D V-Cache CPUs, Azure Prepares For Great Upgrade

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  • yump
    replied
    Originally posted by jaxa View Post

    AMD showed off a 5900X with 3D V-Cache (192 MiB) getting about +15% performance in games when they first announced it.

    The performance gains with Epyc's larger implementation of 3D V-Cache (768 MiB) are much larger. +50% average according to AMD, no improvement in some workloads, but +66-80% in some cases.
    It's not a larger implementation. 96 MiB on each chiplet, 32 on the lower deck and 64 on the upper. Times 2 is 192, times 8 is 768. Chiplets are probably binned for Ryzen or Epyc, but almost certainly manufactured identically.

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  • jaxa
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

    Always take vendor supplied benchmarks with a big grain of salt. Many workloads are probably not going to see any gains from the larger cache. AMD generally doesn't outright cheat on tests the way Intel does, but they aren't above cherry picking which tests they run.
    Article contributed by Amirreza Rastegari, Jon Shelley, Jithin Jose, Evan Burness, and Aman Verma   A Preview program for Azure HBv3 VMs enhanced with AMD EPYC..

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  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by jaxa View Post

    AMD showed off a 5900X with 3D V-Cache (192 MiB) getting about +15% performance in games when they first announced it.

    The performance gains with Epyc's larger implementation of 3D V-Cache (768 MiB) are much larger. +50% average according to AMD, no improvement in some workloads, but +66-80% in some cases.
    Always take vendor supplied benchmarks with a big grain of salt. Many workloads are probably not going to see any gains from the larger cache. AMD generally doesn't outright cheat on tests the way Intel does, but they aren't above cherry picking which tests they run.

    Leave a comment:


  • jaxa
    replied
    With Milan-X there is now 3D V-Cache introduced for the current generation and still-very-impressive EPYC 7003 "Milan" processors. I can personally attest to Milan-X being very exciting for HPC workloads and beyond with impressive gains to performance.
    AMD showed off a 5900X with 3D V-Cache (192 MiB) getting about +15% performance in games when they first announced it.

    The performance gains with Epyc's larger implementation of 3D V-Cache (768 MiB) are much larger. +50% average according to AMD, no improvement in some workloads, but +66-80% in some cases.

    Leave a comment:


  • flashmozzg
    replied
    Originally posted by piotrj3 View Post

    that is not what matters, what matters in GPU is if there is one memory controller for 2 chips or 2 memory controllers, eg does 1 chiplet has very fast access to all memory of GPU (way beyond Infinity Fabric, because when IF has to deal with relativly slow RAM, here dealing with HBM in GPU configuration is crazy high bandwitdh far beyond RAM in Ryzen case). And this is serious challenge. If AMD did that, that is very impressive.
    AFAIK, they are still no there yet, so moving data between chips has to go through 4 IF 3.0 links, which gives 200GB/second bi-derectional bandwith that is really impressive, and on par for regular GDDR, but just a fraction of the insane HBM2E bandwidth those chips have.

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  • piotrj3
    replied
    Originally posted by flashmozzg View Post

    It's not a dual GPU. It's dual chiplets sort of. Like 1st gen Zen. The connection between the chips is coherent,
    that is not what matters, what matters in GPU is if there is one memory controller for 2 chips or 2 memory controllers, eg does 1 chiplet has very fast access to all memory of GPU (way beyond Infinity Fabric, because when IF has to deal with relativly slow RAM, here dealing with HBM in GPU configuration is crazy high bandwitdh far beyond RAM in Ryzen case). And this is serious challenge. If AMD did that, that is very impressive.

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    I am kind of worried about Zen after the latest Intel launch...
    Eh, they'll be fine. AMD stock is up more than 15% since ADL launch. There's a reason for that.

    It's good that we finally have actual competition around now. Hopefully that means lower prices and more performance for everyone.
    Last edited by smitty3268; 09 November 2021, 10:13 PM.

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  • flashmozzg
    replied
    Originally posted by piotrj3 View Post
    MI200 feels odd. It is dual GPU on board card and it is compared vs single chip A100, that on top of that has some unique properties like ability to split into multiple instances. A100 that is already aging, and is single chip and only having between 1.4x to max 2.4x in aplications better performance on newer process node with still subpar CUDA support is .... questionable.

    Also I don't see information about power draw what in such utilization is very important for example 9 out of top10 in Green500 is Nvidia GPU driven.
    It's not a dual GPU. It's dual chiplets sort of. Like 1st gen Zen. The connection between the chips is coherent,

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  • GrayShade
    replied
    Originally posted by drakonas777 View Post
    I like silent and efficient PC: even do not use PBO on my newly acquired 3700X, so it's ~90W at max load, but still maintains ~4GHz all core.
    How much does your whole system use? I've been pretty disappointed with the power usage of my 5950X build.

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  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post

    Not me. Intel still sacrifices security for performance and several cloud providers say Intel runs too hot and have opted out of Intel for now.
    Please show me where Intel still sacrifices security for performance?!

    On the other hand, you seem to forget about this:
    We discover timing and power variations of the prefetch instruction that can be observed from unprivileged user space. In contrast to previous work on prefetch attacks on Intel, we show that the prefetch instruction on AMD leaks even more information. We demonstrate the significance of this side channel with multiple case studies in real-world scenarios. We demonstrate the first microarchitectural break of (fine-grained) KASLR on AMD CPUs. We monitor kernel activity, e.g., if audio is played over Bluetooth, and establish a covert channel. Finally, we even leak kernel memory with 52.85 B/s with simple Spectre gadgets in the Linux kernel. We show that stronger page table isolation should be activated on AMD CPUs by default to mitigate our presented attacks successfully.
    At least get your facts straight when spreading FUD...

    Leave a comment:

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