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More Linux Performance Benchmark Data For Alder Lake, Comparison Data Points

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  • More Linux Performance Benchmark Data For Alder Lake, Comparison Data Points

    Phoronix: More Linux Performance Benchmark Data For Alder Lake, Comparison Data Points

    With the embargo lifted following this morning's Intel Core i5 12600K + Core i9 12900K Linux review, I've begun uploading more public test data to OpenBenchmarking.org and making my earlier test results public. With that and initial data flowing in from others in the community, here is some more data to poke through if interested in Alder Lake on Linux...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...K-i5-12600K-OB

  • #2
    What about the kernel boot log

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cyring View Post
      What about the kernel boot log
      Go to any of the individual benchmarks > At least for my uploads I opt to include system logs > e.g. https://openbenchmarking.org/system/...-MEMORYDDR24/A
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        Thanks for these.

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        • #5
          Michael, can you benchmark the integrated Intel Xe GPU performance and compare it against earlier generations, the integrated graphics in AMD Ryzen, and against dedicated graphics cards.

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          • #6
            I'm curious about benchmarks from ONLY the performance cores vs only the efficiency cores. If they're enumerated in a sensible way, can they be benched with affinity cgroups or something?

            I really hope Intel releases some e-core only hardware, call it an 'i2' or something. For low-end laptops, SBCs, and set top boxes. If the GPU has enough EUs, it'll be great for everyday use.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mangeek View Post
              I really hope Intel releases some e-core only hardware, call it an 'i2' or something. For low-end laptops, SBCs, and set top boxes. If the GPU has enough EUs, it'll be great for everyday use.
              E-cores are Atom cores, so you've already got that. It's called Jasper Lake and Elkhart Lake.

              I'm hoping they DON'T do what you're suggesting, and instead put the M5 and U9 mobile dies with 1 or 2 P-cores and 4 or 8 E-cores into low-end laptops, SBCs, and set top boxes. That's where hybrid x86 can shine, boosting single-thread performance over the Atom-only chips while keeping the TDPs low.

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              • #8
                Any plans to test DDR4 vs DDR5? Anandtech found some none-trival differences for some MT-heavy benchmarks (yCruncher was 30% faster) so it would be useful to see how true it is in general for linux workloads.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Oppenheimer View Post
                  Any plans to test DDR4 vs DDR5? Anandtech found some none-trival differences for some MT-heavy benchmarks (yCruncher was 30% faster) so it would be useful to see how true it is in general for linux workloads.
                  Been debating whether to buy a DDR4 Z690 board but as of writing haven't yet done so, will take a look again at what's available...
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael View Post

                    Been debating whether to buy a DDR4 Z690 board but as of writing haven't yet done so, will take a look again at what's available...
                    Thought it was really cool that Intel hooked you up with samples, as they should (as it's ultimately in their best interest, not so much that they're doing anyone favors). I hope AMD *seriously* considers sending you the samples time and saving you hard-earned money.

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