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Linux 5.15 Is A Very Exciting Kernel For AMD

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  • SaltWater
    replied
    As if, a bunch of false AMD claims once more, never got OpenCl support to work on Linux, VCE hardware video encoding does not work on Linux, while on Windows it works flawlessly, and the history repeats. This titles is like "Buy our products, we promise to support your system, just forget the fact that we never kept our promise before!"

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  • gigi
    replied
    all i care is whether more than 90% issues are resolved for the existing code? merely recognizing device is not enough... i think this applies to latter than former?

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  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    What filesystems are good at that, though?
    BTRFS and whatever unraid uses behind the scenes

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    I highly recommend ZFS, using it to handle around a petabyte storage and it was able to recover from a unexpected hard shut-down when multiple concurrent writes over 10gbe was happening.

    The filesystem is eons ahead of anything else especially considering when it was made, it's only real weakness it's not that flexible when expanding existing pools so plan out your hard drives before
    What filesystems are good at that, though?

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  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
    Aware. Basically it was used as a cheaty way of getting large datasets into one place locally. Didn't worry about losing the array if replacing the motherboard as had backups on a large NAS, but the network wasn't fast enough to support mounting the NAS and accessing via NFS.

    We've since had a network upgrade.


    Heh. No "thumbs up" smiley...


    Ditto.


    And again.

    Thanks folks. Did some tinkering with ZFS to learn how it behaves. Initially had a go using a bunch of small fake disks in VirtualBox then dug out an old box which isn't up to much right now, stuffed a few extra disks in it and had a play on real hardware.

    Worked a treat. Easy to control. Don't need it on the OS drive, so actual messing around during install is minimal.

    As time permits I'll migrate things over to ZFS.
    I highly recommend ZFS, using it to handle around a petabyte storage and it was able to recover from a unexpected hard shut-down when multiple concurrent writes over 10gbe was happening.

    The filesystem is eons ahead of anything else especially considering when it was made, it's only real weakness it's not that flexible when expanding existing pools so plan out your hard drives before
    Last edited by mdedetrich; 14 September 2021, 03:54 AM.

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by flower View Post
    A fake raid is lost when you switch your motherboard
    Aware. Basically it was used as a cheaty way of getting large datasets into one place locally. Didn't worry about losing the array if replacing the motherboard as had backups on a large NAS, but the network wasn't fast enough to support mounting the NAS and accessing via NFS.

    We've since had a network upgrade.

    Originally posted by PSSGCSim View Post
    In my experience mdadm RAID is way more solid than any motherboard RAID and even some RAID cards. "mdadm RAID but the array falls apart on every reboot" this sounds more like you have not set it up properly or the on board SATA controller is faulty. You can also look at ZFS as a really solid alternative but it requires some additional installation under Linux.
    Heh. No "thumbs up" smiley...

    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    If you are talking about fake RAID (i.e. the RAID that is typically enabled in BIOS) then just don't use this RAID. It doesn't matter if its AMD or Intel, fake RAID historically has been trash for various reasons. Either get a HBA or in your case (since you don't have room) then just use software raid, mdadm or solutions like BTRFS/ZFS.
    Ditto.

    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    That's what I do.

    If that's not a ZFS success story I don't know what is.
    And again.

    Thanks folks. Did some tinkering with ZFS to learn how it behaves. Initially had a go using a bunch of small fake disks in VirtualBox then dug out an old box which isn't up to much right now, stuffed a few extra disks in it and had a play on real hardware.

    Worked a treat. Easy to control. Don't need it on the OS drive, so actual messing around during install is minimal.

    As time permits I'll migrate things over to ZFS.

    Leave a comment:


  • moilami
    replied
    Does Intel really make CPUs?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jabberwocky
    replied
    Originally posted by linner View Post
    I have 5 graphics cards, 2 laptops, 1 workstation, and 2 servers. All AMD and none work 100%. AMD just doesn't work that well in my experience.
    I was wondering what you meant about "they need so many changes just to make their stuff work". I thought it was more severe, but understand now thanks. AMD does not dedicated the same amount of resources to Linux compared to Windows and I agree that shows. I would like it if AMD improved it (from the news here they hopefully will), but I don't feel like I can complain about it in my exeperience. Perhaps I just managed to get he parts that worked better for my use-cases. Intel has a better track record for implementing the entire product with advanded power control, sensors, and even odd communication protocols.

    In the past 5 years I have bought/built following AMD systems: 3 laptops, 7 desktops/workstations, 5 graphics cards and 1 server. I had 2 big problems related to early adopting. I had to RMA 1 of the CPUs (1800X) and I struggled a few days to get my server 100% stable due to AGESA-RAM-woes. Besides those 2 release day purchase issues I had no problems*.

    *I have some other problems but I don't think AMD is to blame. One of the CPU temps is not working. The problem is with the ASRock motherboard firmware, not AMD: https://github.com/rigred/sensor_config/issues/3 I have similar other issues with ASRock firmware... The server's GPU caused crashes frequently: https://forum.proxmox.com/threads/pv...ponding.35930/
    I stayed away from any GPU after Polaris so experience is lacking in that area. I have borrowed some cards here and there, but no long term use. I know many people had CPU temp problems from the start, it's just by chance that my problems were ASRock issues and not CPU offset issues like others had. Still it's not like the CPU did not work or that you couldn't read other CPU temps.

    My most recient Intel challenge was helping a friend has a Gigabyte Aorus 15P laptop, i7-11800H with a Geforce 3060 which retails for just over 2300 USD here, which does not boot into Linux. We tried various things but spent hours on it and didn't get it working. Laptops are usually the place where I find the most problems. I bought x2 Dell Ryzen laptops on the release day which worked well for me. Intel is probably not to blame for this, but we still have to figure it out... you win some you lose some.


    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
    To be honest when you compare AMD to Intel in this specific area historically there is a world of difference. That seems to be changing lately though with AMD stepping up their Linux support a lot in the past 2 years.
    I agree with you, just from reading Phoronix I've seen how far in advance Intel commits support/features for unreleased hardware. I trust that it's working since I don't test it myself, but IIRC it's still far ahead compared to AMD especially if you look further back (as you mentioned). This is probably what linner was meaning to say? I had the impression that things were completely broken in linner's experience, due to the way the comment was phrased.

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  • edwaleni
    replied
    The last kernel where Michael got this excited was back at 3.18. That one even made my Athlon laptop run better and I installed it on all my Linux platforms.

    He was right, it was a worthy release. So I tend to believe him when he gets excited about a new release.

    Leave a comment:


  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by peterdk View Post
    Use ZFS for raid?
    Its kinda hard to not use ZFS for RAID, I mean its specifically designed for RAID setups.
    Last edited by mdedetrich; 13 September 2021, 10:13 AM.

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