Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD Ryzen 5 5600G / Ryzen 7 5700G Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Michael, Have you considered making a minecraft benchmark using shaders for GPUs?

    Comment


    • #12
      Originally posted by gukin View Post
      Using my 5700g, I won't be able to play Cyberpunk 2077 until, hopefully, Van Gogh comes out but probably long before 2077; I'll just hold off until I can play.
      By Van Gogh, you mean a Steam Deck or some other option with the same chip? I wonder if it will even hit 720p @ 30 FPS.

      Rembrandt will do better with more cores, 50% more CUs, and higher clock speeds. But since you already have a 5700G maybe you should skip 1-2 generations.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by ctlansdown View Post
        Michael, Have you considered making a minecraft benchmark using shaders for GPUs?
        Unfortunately Minecraft doesn't have a good standard, deterministic client benchmark. Not even a mod for it AFAIK.

        You can pregen a world with the same seed and time it, but thats a Java CPU benchmark.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by gukin View Post

          Looking at the games Michael benchmarked, only Arkham Knight and Shadow of the Tomb Raider would warrant a dGPU, the rest are quite playable. That said, I'm currently playing through Arkham Knight and the places where I notice the frame rate dragging is during the chases in the batmobile. I will say that having an extremely quiet, low power, low heat system is nice.

          Still, if one wanted to buy a new dGPU, a GTX 1650 is $600, an RX 6600 XT is $1000+.

          Using my 5700g, I won't be able to play Cyberpunk 2077 until, hopefully, Van Gogh comes out but probably long before 2077; I'll just hold off until I can play.

          Back to Arkham Knight.
          I suppose that's the other niche in this day and age. A used GTX 950 (or AMD equivalent) is below $100 and objectively better, but buying used isn't always an option, and new GPU prices are indeed ridiculous.

          Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post

          Given that it's super hard to get any dGPU nowadays, its useful for anyone wanting to build a gaming PC. They can build with an APU for now, and have a great CPU while having just enough GPU for causal/esports games, and put in a dGPU later down the line when they can actually get one.

          Also, if you have your memory running at good speeds, the performance will be noticeably higher. AFAICT NotebookCheck was just quoting Userbenchmark numbers for an OEM build, and OEM build are famous for cheap single-channel RAM, therefore the performance might be much lower in those benchmarks than the chip is actually capable of.
          Notebookcheck runs their own benchmarks as far as I can tell, and the Cezzane tests are dual channel in the reviews I saw linked.

          Fast memory is also quite a pricey addition to what's ostensibly a budget build, depending on how high you go.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
            pretty much *any* dGPU you can find is faster
            well, it's not easy to find any dgpu these days

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
              A used GTX 950 (or AMD equivalent) is below $100
              here it's below $200. and with $300 5600g you also get fast cpu

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
                Fast memory is also quite a pricey addition to what's ostensibly a budget build, depending on how high you go.
                You can get pretty good ram at just slightly higher price than the manufacturer recommended ram. With Zen3 you're not going to get Infinity Fabric past 2000MHz unless you win the silicon lottery and buy an expensive motherboard so that's pretty much the speed you need to hit with your ram. Many 3600MHz sticks can do the 4000MHz if you raise their voltage and then it's just hunting for low timings and possibly dual banking. Dual banked 16GiB kits are hard to find but 32GiB kits are pretty much all dual banked, good thing I have use for that.

                This was my analysis when Zen 3 released and I tried to optimize my build value so it might be a bit outdated.

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post

                  Given that it's super hard to get any dGPU nowadays, its useful for anyone wanting to build a gaming PC. They can build with an APU for now, and have a great CPU while having just enough GPU for causal/esports games, and put in a dGPU later down the line when they can actually get one.

                  Also, if you have your memory running at good speeds, the performance will be noticeably higher. AFAICT NotebookCheck was just quoting Userbenchmark numbers for an OEM build, and OEM build are famous for cheap single-channel RAM, therefore the performance might be much lower in those benchmarks than the chip is actually capable of.
                  This.

                  Or... Just wanting to build a good home/work mixed computer with a CPU that boasts good enough perfs to last decently (read: non-intel) in a small form factor, and just want enough GPU power to support dual/triple screen for your daily missions.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post
                    Fast memory is also quite a pricey addition to what's ostensibly a budget build, depending on how high you go.
                    Demonstrably false. Here is a quick budget build from PCPartPicker, price total is ~$800:
                    • CPU: 5700G
                    • Motherboard: Aorus B550M Pro-P
                    • Memory: 2x8 GB Corsair Vengeance Black LPX 3200 MHz
                    • Storage: Kingston A2000 1TB
                    • Case: Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L
                    • PSU: Seasonic Focus 650W Gold
                    Sure, not the best but it'll get 1080p gaming at RX 560 levels (yes 560 not 5600) done for a relatively cheap penny, and adding a $300-$500 GPU once prices are better in a year is not hard.

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      I'm looking to buy one of the 6000-series APUs when they come out, because RDNA2 promises increased power efficiency and I figure this'll help it get the best out of the limited power budget - plus I understand it has raytracing support (I don't expect much, just console tech parity). However, I'm concerned that this will be undermined by lack of AV1 decode (even if vector-based software decode has gotten a lot better).

                      Still, the graphics support in the 5000s would be good enough for the majority of people. True gamers are always going to be able to do better going discrete and will likely be willing to pay the various costs for that.
                      GreenReaper
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by GreenReaper; 08 September 2021, 10:00 AM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X