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AMD Ryzen 5 5600G / Ryzen 7 5700G Linux Gaming Benchmarks

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  • AMD Ryzen 5 5600G / Ryzen 7 5700G Linux Gaming Benchmarks

    Phoronix: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G / Ryzen 7 5700G Linux Gaming Benchmarks

    Recently with my Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 5 5600G and Ryzen 7 5700G Zen 3 APUs with Radeon Vega graphics I touched on the GPU graphics/compute performance in some of the basic benchmarks while in this article are a number of Steam Play and native Linux gaming benchmarks for looking at the potential for these latest-generation desktop APUs for Linux gaming.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30505

  • #2
    Waiting for birdie (avem) to explain why testing methodology was bad.

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    • #3
      Keeping the rest of the system price constant (= same hardware otherwise, such as 1080p display and storage), I'd still go for the higher-end 5700G option as it would only add around +10% extra total price for e.g. a $1000-$1100 price point, which is in line with the expected performance diff.

      Useful test, thanks!

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      • #4
        Would be interesting to see how much a more optimized ram config would help. Like pushing memory and infinity fabric to 1:1 2000MHz, having dual banked memory and thight timings on the memory. This because these APUs are supposed to be very sensitive to memory performance when doing gameing.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Inopia View Post
          Would be interesting to see how much a more optimized ram config would help. Like pushing memory and infinity fabric to 1:1 2000MHz, having dual banked memory and thight timings on the memory. This because these APUs are supposed to be very sensitive to memory performance when doing gameing.
          In the past, performance increases were almost perfectly proportionate with RAM speed increases.
          I'm hoping with RDNA2 APUs and DDR5, that won't be the case. It's not a good sign when performance is so severely bottlenecked.

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          • #6
            What would be the discrete GPU equivalent performance wise for those APUs?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by paulez View Post
              What would be the discrete GPU equivalent performance wise for those APUs?
              Judging by Windows tests I saw in YT, the RX550 and the GT1030. They trade blows with those APUs, winning and losing, depending on the game.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by paulez View Post
                What would be the discrete GPU equivalent performance wise for those APUs?
                Somewhat below a GT 1030 and half as fast as a GTX 950 according to Notebookcheck.


                Hence I don't really get the fascination people have with these APU IGPs. They carry a hefty price premium over, say, an older desktop processor, and pretty much *any* dGPU you can find is faster. They are fantastic for something power limited like laptops, but aren't particularly power efficient at the clocks they use in the desktop platform. As far as HTPC capabilities go, the video blocks are relatively old.


                I guess they're OK in places with weird regional pricing? Or maybe as an alternative to low power NUC-like boards if those aren't available.
                Last edited by brucethemoose; 07 September 2021, 11:35 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post

                  Somewhat below a GT 1030 and half as fast as a GTX 950 according to Notebookcheck.


                  Hence I don't really get the fascination people have with these APU IGPs. They carry a hefty price premium over, say, an older desktop processor, and pretty much *any* dGPU you can find is faster. They are fantastic for something power limited like laptops, but aren't particularly power efficient at the clocks they use in the desktop platform. As far as HTPC capabilities go, the video blocks are relatively old.


                  I guess they're OK in places with weird regional pricing? Or maybe as an alternative to low power NUC-like boards if those aren't available.
                  Given that it's super hard to get any dGPU nowadays, its useful for anyone wanting to build a gaming PC. They can build with an APU for now, and have a great CPU while having just enough GPU for causal/esports games, and put in a dGPU later down the line when they can actually get one.

                  Also, if you have your memory running at good speeds, the performance will be noticeably higher. AFAICT NotebookCheck was just quoting Userbenchmark numbers for an OEM build, and OEM build are famous for cheap single-channel RAM, therefore the performance might be much lower in those benchmarks than the chip is actually capable of.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by brucethemoose View Post

                    Hence I don't really get the fascination people have with these APU IGPs. They carry a hefty price premium over, say, an older desktop processor, and pretty much *any* dGPU you can find is faster. They are fantastic for something power limited like laptops, but aren't particularly power efficient at the clocks they use in the desktop platform. As far as HTPC capabilities go, the video blocks are relatively old.

                    I guess they're OK in places with weird regional pricing? Or maybe as an alternative to low power NUC-like boards if those aren't available.
                    Looking at the games Michael benchmarked, only Arkham Knight and Shadow of the Tomb Raider would warrant a dGPU, the rest are quite playable. That said, I'm currently playing through Arkham Knight and the places where I notice the frame rate dragging is during the chases in the batmobile. I will say that having an extremely quiet, low power, low heat system is nice.

                    Still, if one wanted to buy a new dGPU, a GTX 1650 is $600, an RX 6600 XT is $1000+.

                    Using my 5700g, I won't be able to play Cyberpunk 2077 until, hopefully, Van Gogh comes out but probably long before 2077; I'll just hold off until I can play.

                    Back to Arkham Knight.

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