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AMD + Valve Working On New Linux CPU Performance Scaling Design

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  • #11
    Hello phoronix,
    This page has overlapping numbers on some graphs( & can't see the max), maybe you could add a checkbox to clip numbers to 2 decimal places after the dot:

    https://openbenchmarking.org/result/...=1&ftr=1&ppt=D

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    • #12
      Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
      avg fps and even 1% low percentile don't show bad influence on frame time variance well enough. You will see MangoHUD's frame time graph to look bad with schedutil/powersave when under certain load conditions, causing stutter, missed vblanks etc. While schedutil is way better than intel_pstate powersave (why is this crap the default setting...), it is still not good enough.
      Fair enough, that sounds plausible and difficult to catch in benchmarks unless you look for that specifically. I guess that fixing this is what this AMD + Valve collab is about.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by intelfx View Post
        About time.

        So, once again something only happens in Linux when there is a commercial interest. Not before, not after.
        Three obvious points:

        1) Developer time is not free, developers unless "hobbying" need to get paid.

        2) And you (and everybody else) will get the benefit of this work for free.

        3) The better things get on Linux land the more commercial interests that converge in Linux developments and improvements.

        I see all of this as a positive.

        As per commercial interest, what is Paragon's benefit of mainlining their NTFS driver?
        Last edited by JPFSanders; 02 August 2021, 11:06 AM.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by JPFSanders View Post

          As per commercial interest, what is Paragon's benefit of mainlining their NTFS driver?
          Their main source of income doesn't necessarily come from businesses needing both NTFS and Linux support. Mainlining it takes some of the burden off of them in regards to general maintenance and upkeep of the driver and allows their developers to focus more on the software solutions they can provide for their customers.

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          • #15
            I hope this will help amd apu based laptops to have longer uptime on battery as well.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by intelfx View Post
              About time.

              So, once again something only happens in Linux when there is a commercial interest. Not before, not after.
              Interesting. So, it seems there's no commercial interest in M$ Windows catching up to Linux.

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              • #17
                Firefox went to updating the screen with less than 1 fps (disabling GPU acceleration helps though) and the rest of the desktop also feels sluggish.
                Never had Firefox with less then 20 FPS (mb it depends on content). I have a lot of machines with different nvidia GPUs

                The memory allocator also has trouble allocating larger chunks of VRAM when there still should be enough memory left
                There is a well known problem that called "memory fragmentation".
                Your experience is really interesting, but I don't believe that AMD has better memory allocator than Nvidia.
                I think that you just used cudnn_benchmark=True which drastically increases memory usage in order to find the best algorithm, try to disable it and more likelly you can use batch size of 8 as on your AMD.

                As a result, there are some networks that I can only train with a batch size of 3 when I trained them with a batch size of 8 on my previous Polaris GPU (both cards have 8 GB VRAM).
                Using odd batch size drastically decreases performance, so my advice - never use odd batch size and use even sizes.

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                • #18
                  under manjaro running on A8-7600 i was using something like this:

                  Code:
                  /bin/cpupower frequency-set -g conservative
                  /bin/echo 2 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/conservative/sampling_down_factor
                  /bin/echo 75 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/conservative/up_threshold
                  /bin/echo 10 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/conservative/down_threshold
                  /bin/echo 10 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/conservative/freq_step
                  /bin/echo 1 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/conservative/ignore_nice_load
                  imho the trick is to keep the clocks high enough but not too high. i didn't want the cpu to go full turbo when there's no need, and huge jumps in cpu clock back and forth are also kinda pointless. conservative scheduler is perfect for that since it can be configured as above to ramp up the clocks fast enough when there's any load, but at the same time it won't go too high and won't be downclocking like crazy unless the load really goes down. the difference is perfectly visible while watching movies for example, when decoding them on the cpu, but it works just as well with games.

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                  • #19
                    Since this is CPU scaling work couldn't it have spillover effects such as making epyc a little faster/power efficient? If so this could be huge not just for gaming but for everything!

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by perpetually high View Post

                      You say that like it's a woke statement. More of a captain obvious

                      Hey, linux is free, and anyone can modify it. You want to gain traction and movement, yeah, you're going have to put money, people, and resources behind it. Who has those? Commercial interest and corporations. So what exactly is your point?
                      The un-obvious part is that the traction and movement attainable by a single enthusiast (or a small group thereof) is basically not enough for anything in Linux anymore.
                      Last edited by intelfx; 03 August 2021, 03:29 AM.

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