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AMD EPYC 72F3 Linux Performance For 8-Core Zen 3 Server CPU

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  • AMD EPYC 72F3 Linux Performance For 8-Core Zen 3 Server CPU

    Phoronix: AMD EPYC 72F3 Linux Performance For 8-Core Zen 3 Server CPU

    Over the past month we have been quite impressed by the performance of the EPYC 7003 series Milan processors when looking at the top-tier parts, but how does Zen 3 do for lower-tier server CPUs? Recently we were supplied with two EPYC 72F3 processors from AMD for these 8-core high performance SKUs. In our initial look at the EPYC 72F3 Linux performance is seeing how they compare to the similar previous-generation EPYC 7F32 processor.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30155

  • #2
    The all new Zen 3.

    Throw your Zen 2 in the trash.
    It's a piece of shit.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      The all new Zen 3.

      Throw your Zen 2 in the trash.
      It's a piece of shit.
      I don't think this is a good mentality. The Zen 2 could get another use.

      Not everyone is able to afford a new processor every year, especially after the pandemic.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

        I don't think this is a good mentality. The Zen 2 could get another use.

        Not everyone is able to afford a new processor every year, especially after the pandemic.
        Click this and watch it, especially the part around 1:40.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          Click this and watch it, especially the part around 1:40.
          Sadly, I cannot comprehend movie references....

          Wait a moment, is this EPYC without ECC?! I don't see ECC mentioned anywhere in the page...
          Last edited by tildearrow; 26 April 2021, 03:09 PM.

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          • #6
            So sad they dropped "cheap" 8core versions with Milan/Zen3 version. There were many EPYC Rome 8-Core Processors sold below 700€, which where worth compared to their Ryzen equivalent. Of course ECC-memory makes them slightly less affordable (80€/16G)

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            • #7
              I want something like this in a laptop not my server, 256MB of L3 cache is insane for an 8 core, nice and roomy. Could fit an entire OS into cache if it was minimal enough!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                Click this and watch it, especially the part around 1:40.
                are they sold at BestBuy or Fry's ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                  Phoronix: AMD EPYC 72F3 Linux Performance For 8-Core Zen 3 Server CPU

                  Over the past month we have been quite impressed by the performance of the EPYC 7003 series Milan processors when looking at the top-tier parts, but how does Zen 3 do for lower-tier server CPUs? Recently we were supplied with two EPYC 72F3 processors from AMD for these 8-core high performance SKUs. In our initial look at the EPYC 72F3 Linux performance is seeing how they compare to the similar previous-generation EPYC 7F32 processor.

                  https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30155
                  It would be very informative to benchmark Ryzen 5800X (dual-channel DDR4 51.2 GB/s, 32 MB L3 cache) against EPYC 72F3 (octa-channel DDR4 204.8 GB/s, 256 MB L3 cache).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post

                    It would be very informative to benchmark Ryzen 5800X (dual-channel DDR4 51.2 GB/s, 32 MB L3 cache) against EPYC 72F3 (octa-channel DDR4 204.8 GB/s, 256 MB L3 cache).
                    Indeed. I'm honestly curious why the EPYC 72F3 doesn't actually clock more than 200Mhz higher on boost than it's predecessor. I know AMD doesn't measure TDP the same between all their parts, but I could swear I've seen reviews of Ryzen 5000 where the 8 and 16 core "105 watt" parts were still only drawing 130-140 actual watts while boosting to 4.4-4.6Ghz all core depending on workload (AVX, SSE, etc.) & thermals. Is the larger EPYC I/O die really consuming an extra 40-50 watts for all those PCIe lanes and DDR4 channels, and even then they have to clock the cores 300-500Mhz lower to stay in 180 watts?

                    Not to mention an 8 core EPYC with only a single core enabled on each of the 8 chiplets should be positively easy to cool. It's still an impressive part, but the power & performance numbers don't quite add up in my opinion.
                    Last edited by nranger; 26 April 2021, 10:23 PM.

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