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Dynatron A38 Performance For Cooling 280 Watt AMD EPYC CPUs

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  • Dynatron A38 Performance For Cooling 280 Watt AMD EPYC CPUs

    Phoronix: Dynatron A38 Performance For Cooling 280 Watt AMD EPYC CPUs

    Announced in March by Dynatron was their A38 CPU cooler for AMD Ryzen Threadripper and EPYC processors. This heatsink fan is rated for cooling up to 280 Watt SP3/sTRX4/TR4 processors making it capable of cooling even the newest high-end EPYC "Milan" processors with the EPYC 75F3 and 7763 processors. Here are some initial benchmarks of this cooler with the AMD EPYC 7763 server processor.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30106

  • #2
    Hi Micheal

    8000RPM?
    What does that sound like?
    Any chance you could add a db measurement also?

    br Magnus

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pracedru View Post
      8000RPM? What does that sound like?
      A fan with 7 blades spinning at 8,000rpm-11,000rpm means you will possibly hear a tone of 933Hz-1283Hz among all the noise.

      https://onlinetonegenerator.com/?freq=933
      https://onlinetonegenerator.com/?freq=1283

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      • #4
        Don‘t you think it will be a spectrum peaking at those frequencies? This should be not as annoying as a pure sine. But thanks for that impression - as disgusting as it is.

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        • #5
          *ahem* *screams in 11,000RPM*

          That's not something you will want anywhere near you

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          • #6
            Originally posted by boxie View Post
            *ahem* *screams in 11,000RPM*

            That's not something you will want anywhere near you
            No doubt. IME most Dynatron coolers are targeted more towards a datacenter usage where noise isn't a factor. Not something you'd want to have in a home or office environment with people present. If you have an EPYC, go for the Noctua cooler instead.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
              No doubt. IME most Dynatron coolers are targeted more towards a datacenter usage where noise isn't a factor. Not something you'd want to have in a home or office environment with people present. If you have an EPYC, go for the Noctua cooler instead.
              oh yeah, without a doubt!

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              • #8
                It would be nice if you had tests like:

                128 instances of generate large mandelbrot image to file( https://gist.github.com/andrejbauer/7919569 )
                or if the cpu is not busy then 512 instances of mandelbrot.c

                or
                120 vms running alpine linux running golang binary file running zimbabwe stock market buy/sell/trade ||stock price prediction algorithms.


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by onlyLinuxLuvUBack View Post
                  running golang binary file running zimbabwe stock market buy/sell/trade ||stock price prediction algorithms.
                  Got any link/info on that benchmark?
                  Michael Larabel
                  http://www.michaellarabel.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                    No doubt. IME most Dynatron coolers are targeted more towards a datacenter usage where noise isn't a factor. Not something you'd want to have in a home or office environment with people present. If you have an EPYC, go for the Noctua cooler instead.
                    It is for those working in it, god bless 3M Peltor headsets...

                    (I work in datacenters where thousands of servers have between 6 and 10 30mm fans spinning at 20.000+rpm all the time).

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