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AMD Ryzen 5000 Temperature Monitoring Support Sent In For Linux 5.12

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  • #51
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    The issue has nothing to do with the number of developers - it has everything to do with the fact that AMD refuses to share documentation about Zen CPUs. Compare what HWiNFO64 reports for Ryzen CPUs and what 's shown in Linux. Under Windows you see like four dozen datapoints for e.g. Zen 2 CPUs and less than four under Linux. So much for AMD's open source friendliness. It's just amazing that Open Source fans continue to praise the company despite glaring long-standing issues with Open Source support. It's almost as if AMD supports Linux just enough to make open source fans happy and in reality they want to keep their secrets close to their chest just like all other companies.
    No off-the-shelf consumer motherboard has Linux support, unfortunately. DELL and Lenovo have systems with support (but tend to require a decent number of patches).
    For proper support, you need to go to server platforms. Everything else are at least in part hacks with significant community contribution.
    Last edited by mppix; 15 February 2021, 11:34 PM.

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    • #52
      Originally posted by mppix View Post
      No off-the-shelf consumer motherboard has Linux support, unfortunately. DELL and Lenovo have systems with support (but tend to require a decent number of patches).
      For proper support, you need to go to server platforms. Everything else are at least in part hacks with significant community contribution.
      what do you mean by linux support ? i use a ASRock X399 Taichi with an 1920X and it works well...

      it does all i want. so what is the linux support you talking about ?
      Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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      • #53
        Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post

        what do you mean by linux support ? i use a ASRock X399 Taichi with an 1920X and it works well...

        it does all i want. so what is the linux support you talking about ?
        i believe he is referring to its sensors. my msi z490 unfiy for example, on windows with hwinfo, show's a dozen different voltages, cpu power consumption, per core power consumption, processor c-states, thermal throttling, turbo boost 3 window, ringbus speed, memory speed and cas ratings, vrm temperatures, vrm current, vrm temps, temperature of my cpu socket, motherboards cpu temp, all my fans, a temperature of my top pci-express slot, dram socket temperature, nvme socket temperatures, and a whole lot more. its extremely detailed.

        on linux all i get is the cpu package temps and per core temp that's provided solely by intel themselves that's intergrated onto the cpu itself, and the actual thermal sensors on my nvme controllers themselves (which i have three of). followed by my 6900 xt which shows fan, gpu temp, hotspot temp, memory temp, and power consumption. it doesn't show everything else my 6900 xt has, like its vrm temps and a whole slew of other stuff.

        i'll NEVER understand how hwinfo, a genuinely freeware program, can some how get all these documents and schematics to show all this stuff but linux can't. if motherboard vendors "leak" this stuff to hwinfo, and turn around and claim it can't hand it to linux community because (sensor manufacturers top secret, competitive advantage reasons) then quite frankly more pressure should be placed on hwinfo for violating the sensor manufacturers who are having there stuff "leaked" to hwinfo. its not right hwinfo gets special treatment while linux gets shafted. its not right at all.

        i can let aida64 pass since you pay for that.
        Last edited by fafreeman; 16 February 2021, 12:29 AM.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by creative View Post
          Even if stuff is a bit off, I would settle for an approximation, rather than nothing.
          Well, personally, I would, too. But many people just take it for granted and complain if it doesn't work perfectly for them.
          Which I can understand very well, too. So I can understand and support the decision by the k10temp maintainers.
          Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post
          If you can't effectively see temperatures, current, voltage, power consumption, you can't find out if your CPU is defective. Are any of the cores achieving turbo? Are all of them achieving base frequency atleast? What's holding it back? Only the above stats can tell you if there's something holding back the CPU. And since you can't see them........
          Frequency monitoring has nothing to do with this, it's completely separate.

          Apart from that: yes, hardware monitoring is absolutely essential.
          However, if your monitoring is unreliable, it's useless. And the k10temp current/voltage/power consumption monitoring is unreliable. Same for zenpower.
          It's AMD's fault for not providing proper instructions to the mainboard manufacturers and not releasing proper docs on the CPUs.

          So don't get me wrong: I absolutely want to have monitoring of my CPU. But it has to be properly implemented and verified.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by Keith Myers View Post

            Which is what particularly irked all of us Crosshair VI and VII Hero board users which were premium boards. Those SIO chips never worked correctly.

            Forced the BIOS devs to come up with a WMI BIOS interface to get around the major issues with the ITE chips. Sadly the WMI BIOS went away with the x570 boards.

            The asus-wmi-sensors driver that uses the WMI interface works wonderfully on my C7H motherboards. As much info as you get with HWinf064 in Windows.
            Ugh......WMI. that thing we have to suffer with. Trying to figure out how to call something with it is a pain in the ass.

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            • #56
              Originally posted by creative View Post

              Just did an lsmod, nct6775 which is the particular nuvoton super i/o chip. Definitely one of the cheapest of the X570 boards but also one of the most capable, yet lacking in bells in whistles, which for me were not needed.
              That is the standard kernel driver for the Nuvoton SIO chips. I have it on both my Asrock boards. But very limited in functionality. Most of the values are totally bogus without some major scaling configuration files.

              But there are other alternative third-party drivers that have been reverse-engineered that work very well. Zenpower and ryzen_smu come to mind.

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              • #57
                Originally posted by creative View Post

                Here is the X570-P I have.

                https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...p_am4_atx.html

                If you zoom in on the flat layout picture, you will see at least one nuvoton near the battery.

                Buildzoid did an excellent breakdown on that board, one of the reasons I went with it.

                Here is the video of him covering it.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2gKFzNEgOY
                Thanks, And thanks Keith Myers, I'll check out that breakdown.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

                  Clock speed should already be reported....... don't tell me even THAT'S missing.
                  I can get that from /proc/cpuinfo. To have the peak clocks at least temporarily recorded by present uptime or desktop session by an application is another story.
                  Last edited by creative; 16 February 2021, 09:50 AM.
                  Manjaro: R7 5800X, 32GB DDR4 3200, GTX 1070

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by creative View Post

                    Intel right now is a go to if you need to do a full system upgrade. An i7 10700k along with a motherboard and ram is a pretty good deal at the moment for what you pay.

                    A reason I went to a 5800x is cause I was already on the x570 platform, and it was the next best option to the 5900x which is outrageously out of my price range at the moment due to supply and extremely high demand.
                    While at least two people liked my post concerning going intel, I would like it to be noted. That if I were to do a full system upgrade right now and was on old hardware, I still would not go intel. I have various reasons why I would not do so.

                    At current date, I stand by AMD. In fact and most intrestingly enough, I would go so far as to say between my experiences with Z270 and X570. AMD has been the better experience.

                    Nuff said.
                    Last edited by creative; 16 February 2021, 09:51 AM.
                    Manjaro: R7 5800X, 32GB DDR4 3200, GTX 1070

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                    • #60
                      If anyone is really that worried about how accurate the reporting of the temperatures from their specific super i/o chip included with your motherboard, I think it would be safe to say that one could set a power limit in celsius via bios. A setting of 80c should be a good target with minimal performance loss. Also a manual setting of PBO values for example will give very similar results, though one might want to do their own research into their own motherboard equivalent to a power limit of 80°C.

                      For mine it was, PPT=120, TDC=80, EDC=125.

                      Otherwise I personally am not worried about things being on auto.

                      Its not unheard of for modern motherboards to give floating values that are behind the speed at which temperatures occur and are then reported. There will always be some degree of latency in which values get reported in a readable form.

                      Some are conventionally recieved and others are not.

                      I am not an electrical engineer or coder.
                      Last edited by creative; 16 February 2021, 11:07 AM.
                      Manjaro: R7 5800X, 32GB DDR4 3200, GTX 1070

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